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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Macon County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

This Was Andersonville

 
 
This Was Andersonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
1. This Was Andersonville Marker
Inscription. You are about to enter Andersonville, one of the largest Confederate prisoner-of-war camps. Of the 45,000 Union soldiers confined here, nearly 13,000 died.

Beyond a walking tour of the stockade area, a visit to Andersonville involves an inner journey - to imagine prisoners' existence here and to discover the meaning of the place from the fragments that remain. Throughout the site there are clues to the high rate of mortality.

"Then came the captives, weary, worn and hungry from prolonged travel cooped up like beasts in freight cars. Down from the depot they marched amid the jeers and taunts of a gaping crowd. The gate opened. The stockade swallowed them." Lessel Long, 13th Indiana Infantry. February 21, 1864
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 32° 11.827′ N, 84° 7.63′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Macon County. Marker is on Cemetery Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is along trail that leads from the Visitor Center to the stockade area. Marker is in this post office area: Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. To the Vermonters who Perished at Andersonville (a few steps from this marker); Oflag 64 Prisoners of War
This Was Andersonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
2. This Was Andersonville Marker
(a few steps from this marker); 27th Bombardment Group (a few steps from this marker); American Ex-Prisoners of War (a few steps from this marker); Memorial to POWs at Hiroshima, Japan (within shouting distance of this marker); The Battling Bastards of Bataan (within shouting distance of this marker); Earthwork Defenses (within shouting distance of this marker); National Prisoner of War Museum (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Andersonville.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Andersonville National Historic Site virtual tour by markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Andersonville National Historic Site. National Park Service site. (Submitted on October 6, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Information about Andersonville and an offer to assist. As a part time historian and volunteer for the National Park Service at this site for many years, I want to offer my services in helping answer questions on the
This Was Andersonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
3. This Was Andersonville Marker
history of Andersonville or as the park is today. I also have the historic sites database here at my fingertips and will do lookups FREE for the asking.
Kevin (Submitted on October 10, 2008, by Kevin Frye of Butler, Georgia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
This Was Andersonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 4, 2008
4. This Was Andersonville Marker
Reconstructed northeast corner of stockade visible at rear left of photo.
This Was Andersonville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 8, 2008
5. This Was Andersonville Marker
View of Andersonville from the Marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 24, 2018. This page originally submitted on October 6, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,120 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   4. submitted on October 6, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   5. submitted on October 1, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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