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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Crescent City in Del Norte County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

National Tribute Grove

5000 Acres

 

— Largest World War II Memorial in the United States —

 
National Tribute Grove Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, August 19, 2018
1. National Tribute Grove Marker
Inscription.  
–top plaque–
This Unit of 500 Acres in the
National Tribute Grove
is Preserved Through the
National Society
Daughters of the American Revolution

To Honor Those Who Served in the Armed Forces
of the United States in World War II
and to Keep Inviolate These Primeval Sequoias
as an American Heritage

–lower plaque–
In the Preservation
of These Redwoods
One-half of the Purchase Funds
Was Contributed by
The State of California

 
Erected 1949 by National Society Daughters of of the American Revolution; Save the Redwoods League; Garden Club of America.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 41° 48.145′ N, 124° 5.103′ W. Marker is near Crescent City, California, in Del Norte County. Marker is located in the Day Use area within the Jedediah Smith State Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Crescent City CA 95531, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker
National Tribute Grove Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, August 19, 2018
2. National Tribute Grove Marker
Small plaque on marker highlighting the National Tribute Grove boundary
, measured as the crow flies. Simpson-Reed Grove (approx. 1.4 miles away); Simpson-Reed Discovery Trail (approx. 1.4 miles away); The Metcalf Grove (approx. 3.4 miles away); Crescent City Tsunami, 1964 (approx. 6.6 miles away); S.S. Emidio (approx. 6.8 miles away); Remembering Billy Boone (approx. 6.8 miles away); Dedication to Henry Sause, Jr. (approx. 7 miles away); Battery Point Lighthouse (approx. 7.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Crescent City.
 
More about this marker. *NOTE* The marker mentions 500 acres of preserved Redwoods which was probably the initial grove size set aside in 1949 but the grove has since expanded to 5,000 acres today.

Marker is located in the Jedediah Smith State Park and in the Day Use portion of the park (north of the campground). A day use fee of $8 is required if visitors stay to tour the park area. No fee is required if only passing through or visiting this monument.
 
Regarding National Tribute Grove. The 5,000 acre National Tribute Grove is located south of this marker and across the Smith River and not readily accessible by visitors as there are no roads or trails to the grove. After talking with a park ranger at the nearby visitor center, it is understood that this grove of old growth sequoias is to remain inaccessible for the most part to the general public in order to preserve its primeval status.

The following is text taken from the Save the Redwoods League website which published an article on September 26, 2014 to highlight this memorial:

In 1945, with victory in Europe and Japan within sight, individuals and organizations all across the country united in a nationwide effort to preserve 5,000 acres of old-growth redwoods as the National Tribute Grove. The effort, led by
National Tribute Grove Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, August 19, 2018
3. National Tribute Grove Marker
Save the Redwoods League and aided by the Garden Club of America, would honor the 16.1 million men and women who served in America’s Armed Forces during World War II.

Thousands of people and organizations from all 48 states and the territories of Alaska and Hawaii contributed to help fund the National Tribute Grove in Jedediah Smith Redwoods State Park, with the name of each donor recorded in a “Golden Book” in the National Archives, along the names of the soldiers, sailors, Marines and airmen their contributions honor.

The grove was dedicated 65 years ago, on September 25, 1949. At the dedication ceremony, Newton Drury, who was then director of the National Park Service after having led the League for many years, spoke for all Americans when he said the National Tribute Grove was to be known as an ever-living “memorial of eternal gratitude, eternally expressed” to those men and women who served in the armed forces of the United States in World War II and so preserved American freedom.

According to the National Park Service, the National Tribute Grove is the largest WWII memorial in America. But, the grove was lost to near-obscurity for many years, as road changes and vegetation growth hid the marker in shadows.

The grove marker was recently unveiled and rededicated in a new location in the park’s day use area,
National Tribute Grove Marker image. Click for full size.
By Douglass Halvorsen, August 19, 2018
4. National Tribute Grove Marker
so that this unparalleled monument to our veterans will be remembered and appreciated for generations to come.

 
Also see . . .  History of Redwoods and Save the Redwoods League - 100 Years of Protecting Redwoods. An excellent interactive timeline of the history of the Redwoods and the movements over the years to preserve the last remaining old-growth timber in the Pacific Northwest. (Submitted on August 19, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon.) 
 
Categories. EnvironmentParks & Recreational AreasWar, World II
 

More. Search the internet for National Tribute Grove.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 22, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 19, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. This page has been viewed 63 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 19, 2018, by Douglass Halvorsen of Klamath Falls, Oregon. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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