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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
LaFayette in Walker County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Cumming

 
 
Fort Cumming Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, October 29, 2007
1. Fort Cumming Marker
Inscription. Here stood a Cherokee Indian stockade with blockhouse on hill, built by U.S. Government in 1836.

Capt. Samuel Fariss and a company of Georgia volunteers guarded Cherokee Indians here before their removal to the west.

This fort was presumably named for Rev. David B. Cumming, Methodist minister and missionary to the Cherokees.
 
Erected 1952 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 146-1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission, and the Trail of Tears marker series.
 
Location. 34° 42.912′ N, 85° 17.289′ W. Marker is in LaFayette, Georgia, in Walker County. Marker is on W. Indiana Avenue near Part Street, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: La Fayette GA 30728, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Marsh-Warthen House (approx. 0.6 miles away); African American Pioneers of the Marsh-Warthen-Clements House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Chattooga Academy (approx. 0.6 miles away); To Our Confederate Soldiers (approx. 0.6 miles away); General LaFayette
Fort Cumming Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
2. Fort Cumming Marker
View of rehabbed marker
(approx. 0.6 miles away); Walker County (approx. 0.6 miles away); John B. Gordon Hall (approx. 0.6 miles away); The Battle of LaFayette (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in LaFayette.
 
Regarding Fort Cumming. Fort Cumming was a stockade that housed Cherokee Indians before their removal on the Trail of Tears. Nothing remains of the fort.

On December 29, 1835, at New Echota, the capital of the Cherokee Nation, some of the Cherokee leaders signed a treaty with the U.S. government agreeing to the removal of all Cherokees to the West. The Native Americans who signed the treaty also agreed to relinquish all Cherokee lands east of the Mississippi River.

The U.S. Senate ratified the treaty on May 23, 1836, and the Cherokees were given two years to leave Georgia. Many Cherokees did not recognize the New Echota Treaty and refused to leave their homes. Gen. Winfield Scott was charged with gathering together the Cherokees and removing them from Southeast.

Stockades were built to house the Cherokees until they could be removed to the West. Fort Cumming in LaFayette was one of those stockades. Capt. Samuel Farris and a company
Fort Cumming Marker and the site of the fort today image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, November 18, 2008
3. Fort Cumming Marker and the site of the fort today
of Georgia volunteers guarded the Cherokees until their removal. The fort is believed to have housed about 500 men, women and children. It was built in 1836 and named for David B. Cumming, a Methodist minister and missionary to the Cherokees.

The fort was a large enclosure of upright logs with a rifle tower in each corner. No photos or drawings of the structure have been found. The stockade with block house was built on a hill just above the area now known as Big Spring. Today the site is near the west end of Indiana Avenue.

(Source: James A Sartainís History of Walker County, 1932, and This is Your Georgia, 1977, by Bernice McCullar and Sibley Jennings.)
 
Also see . . .
1. Wikipedia entry for the Trail of Tears. The "removal to the west" mentioned on the marker was later referred to as the "Trail of Tears." (Submitted on October 24, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.) 

2. Cherokee Removal: Forts Along the Georgia Trail of Tears. A draft report on the Trail of Tears in Georgia, compiled by Sarah H. Hill under a joint partnership between the National Parks Service and the Georgia Department of Natural Resources/Historic Preservation Division in 2005. Page 54 includes information about Fort Cumming. (Submitted on October 24, 2008, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USNative Americans
 
Fort Cumming Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 20, 2014
4. Fort Cumming Marker
View of the marker looking east along West Indiana Street.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 23, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,183 times since then and 56 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 23, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2. submitted on April 28, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   3. submitted on November 18, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   4. submitted on April 28, 2015, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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