Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hagerstown in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hagerstonians in the Civil War

The Rebels MacGill

 
 
Hagerstonians in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
1. Hagerstonians in the Civil War Marker
Inscription.  A local doctor and father of 11, Charles MacGill (1806-1881) was a co-founder of the Hagerstown Herald and was a major general in the Maryland Militia.

On September 30, 1861, Union troops came to his home to arrest him “on the authority of the Secretary of State”. Believing it a violation of his Constitutional rights, he pushed two Federal soldiers down the first steps of his home and his daughter attacked the soldiers with a buggy whip. A scuffle ensued in which his son was wounded by a saber cut to the neck.

MacGill was sent as a political prisoner to Fort Warren in Boston. There he befriended Confederate Major (later Brigadier General) Hiram Granbury, and arranged to have Granbury's young cancer-stricken wife transported to Hagerstown. In July, 1863, he opened a hospital for sick and wounded Confederate soldiers that arrived in the Gettysburg Campaign. He left with the Confederate army and served in the Confederate Medical Corps through the end of the War.

Four of his sons also served in the Confederate army: William, James and Davidge served as privates in Company C, of the 1st Maryland Cavalry.
Hagerstonians in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
2. Hagerstonians in the Civil War Marker
His son Charles G.W. (1833-1907) was commissioned surgeon of the 2nd Virginia Infantry Regiment (Stonewall Brigade). MacGill returned to Hagerstown after the War, but then moved to Richmond, Virginia to be nearer some of his children. The younger Dr. MacGill settled in Catonsville, outside Baltimore. James MacGill (1844-1923) settled in Virginia where he married Lucy Lee Hill; daughter of General A.P. Hill. He became a prominent leader in the Virginia organization of the United Confederate Veterans.
 
Location. 39° 38.463′ N, 77° 43.272′ W. Marker is in Hagerstown, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker is on South Potomac Street (Maryland Route 65 Frontage Road), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 49 South Potomac Avenue, Hagerstown MD 21740, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Hose Company (within shouting distance of this marker); The Last Confederate Incursion North of the Potomac River (within shouting distance of this marker); Retreat from Gettysburg (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Our Journey Transports Us Through Time (about 400 feet away); A City Divided (about 500 feet away); Hagerstown Ransomed
Surgeon Charles MacGill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
3. Surgeon Charles MacGill
Close-up of photo on marker
(about 500 feet away); The Ransom of Hagerstown (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Hagerstonians in the Civil War (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hagerstown.
 
Categories. Notable PersonsScience & MedicineWar, US Civil
 
Hiram Granbury image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
4. Hiram Granbury
Close-up of photo on marker
MacGill House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
5. MacGill House
The MacGills lived just north of Antietam Street on South Potomac Street.
Close-up of photo on marker
Charles G. W. MacGill image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 25, 2019
6. Charles G. W. MacGill
Close-up of photo on marker
James MacGill, later in life, wearing his veterans' organization uniform. image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
7. James MacGill, later in life, wearing his veterans' organization uniform.
from Men of Mark in Virginia, 1906, by Lyon Gardiner Tyler. Private James MacGill of the 1st Maryland, Co. C, became Brigadier General James MacGill of the United Confederate Veterans.
 

More. Search the internet for Hagerstonians in the Civil War.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 29, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 26, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 73 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 26, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   2. submitted on January 28, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 26, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement