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Arlington in Arlington County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Lives of the Soldiers

 
 
Lives of the Soldiers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, January 27, 2019
1. Lives of the Soldiers Marker
Inscription.  At the peak of the Civil War, as many as 1,000 soldiers were garrisoned at Fort Ethan Allen.

The men who built and defended the fort belonged to volunteer regiments recruited from New York, Massachusetts, and other northern states. While stationed at Fort Ethan Allen, troops saw little action, but continually trained, maintained their weapons and felled trees to keep a clear line of sight toward Chain Bridge and Leesburg Turnpike.

"He [Lincoln] will shake hands with a common soldier that he has never seen or heard of before with as much warmth and friendship as he would with an old acquaintance."
—Private Vernando Bruce, 4th New York Heavy Artillery, August 7, 1862, writing about a visit to Fort Ethan Allen by President Lincoln

(Captions)
The Bonds of War
For soldiers who were often kin or pre-war acquaintances, the regiment became a family away from home. When not working, they played games, read, and occasionally visited nearby sights. War forged strong relationships that only ended with death in battle or old age after the war.

"This morning, we
Bonds of War image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2019
2. Bonds of War
For soldiers who were often kin or pre-war acquaintances, the regiment became a family away from home. When not working, they played games, read, and occasionally visited nearby sights. War forged strong relationships that only ended with death in battle or old age after the war.

Camp McDowell Arlington Heights 1863
Close-up of photo on marker
had to pitch our tents in line and then wash up so as to be clean as possible for inspection. Then I got a chance to go where I wanted to for a long time. I went in the direction of Fairfax Courthouse."

—Sergeant James B. Randall, Co. F, 169th New York Volunteer Infantry, Fort Ethan Allen, October 1862

Advantages of Fort Living
Heavy artillery troops garrisoned at Fort Ethan Allen lived in barracks built just to the north of the fort, near present-day Military Road. Infantrymen camped in tents farther away from the fort. After serving at the fort, soldiers, often headed to southern campaigns, where life on the field of battle was harsher than in the forts and camps around Washington, D.C.

Women at the Fort
At Fort Ethan Allen and other posts, officers often hosted their wives, children, or relatives during the winter season when the armies went into winter camp. In addition, forts employed authorized laundresses, often soldiers' wives. One such wife who added pie making to her services ended up making more money than her husband.

Officers' Quarters at Fort Ethan Allen
One of the first forts built around Washington, Fort Ethan Allen initially housed troops in tents erected inside the parapet walls. Later, barracks, officers' quarters, mess houses, and cook houses were built outside the fort's walls.

Fort
Sergeant James B. Randall,<br>Co. F, 169th New York Volunteer Infantry,<br>Fort Ethan Allen. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2019
3. Sergeant James B. Randall,
Co. F, 169th New York Volunteer Infantry,
Fort Ethan Allen.
Close-up of photo on marker
Ethan Allen Headquarters Building

Black crepe draped the fort's administrative center as the nation mourned the death of President Lincoln on April 15, 1865.
 
Location. 38° 55.468′ N, 77° 7.418′ W. Marker is in Arlington, Virginia, in Arlington County. Marker is on North Old Glebe Road south of North Randolph Court, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3829 North Strafford Street, Arlington VA 22207, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Communications along the Defensive Line (here, next to this marker); Protecting the Fort (here, next to this marker); Fort Ethan Allen—What to Look For (here, next to this marker); The View in 1865 (within shouting distance of this marker); A Defensive Artillery Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); A Bastion-Style Fort Is a Mighty Fortress (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); A Defensive Stronghold, Heavily Armed (about 400 feet away); Welcome to Fort Ethan Allen (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Arlington.
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesIndustry & CommercePoliticsWar, US CivilWomen
 
Women at the Fort image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Women at the Fort
At Fort Ethan Allen and other posts, officers often hosted their wives, children, or relatives during the winter season when the armies went into winter camp. In addition, forts employed authorized laundresses, often soldiers' wives. One such wife who added pie making to her services ended up making more money than her husband.

Tent life of the 31st Penn. Inf. (later, 82d Penn. Inf.) at Queen's farm, vicinity of Fort Slocum.
Advantages of Fort Living image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2019
5. Advantages of Fort Living
Heavy artillery troops garrisoned at Fort Ethan Allen lived in barracks built just to the north of the fort, near present-day Military Road. Infantrymen camped in tents farther away from the fort. After serving at the fort, soldiers, often headed to southern campaigns, where life on the field of battle was harsher than in the forts and
Close-up of map on marker
Officer's Quarters at Fort Ethan Allen image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2019
6. Officer's Quarters at Fort Ethan Allen
One of the first forts built around Washington, Fort Ethan Allen initially housed troops in tents erected inside the parapet walls. Later, barracks, officers' quarters, mess houses, and cook houses were built outside the fort's walls.
Close-up of photo on marker
Headquarters Building<br>Fort Ethan Allen image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 20, 2019
7. Headquarters Building
Fort Ethan Allen
Black crepe draped the fort's administrative center as the nation mourned the death of President Lincoln on April 15, 1865.
Close-up of photo on marker
 

More. Search the internet for Lives of the Soldiers.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 30, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 76 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on January 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   2, 3, 4. submitted on April 28, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   5, 6, 7. submitted on April 29, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Wide shot of marker and its surroundings. • Can you help?
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