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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Buckeye Lake in Licking County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Buckeye Lake

 
 
Buckeye Lake Marker (side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 19, 2008
1. Buckeye Lake Marker (side A)
Inscription. [Marker Front]:
Formed by the retreating glacier more than 14,000 years ago, Buckeye Lake first existed as a shallow, swampy pond, named "Buffalo Swamp" by Ohio Company explorer Christopher Gist in 1751. Beginning in 1826 the State developed it as a water source for the Licking Summit of the Ohio and Erie Canal, it being the highest level between the Scioto and Licking rivers. Engineers dammed the north and west sides of the swamp, inadvertently creating a unique floating sphagnum-heath bog surrounded by water. Cranberry Bog, with boreal vegetation typical of glacial-era Ohio, is a registered National Natural Landmark.

[Marker Reverse]:
After the summit level of the canal became inactive in the 1890s, the State developed Licking Summit Reservoir (Buckeye Lake) for recreation. The lake has 3,800 acres of water, 35 miles of shoreline, and twenty islands. Millersport, Buckeye Lake Village, Thornport/Thornville and Hebron all developed as a result of the lake and canal system. Buckeye Lake Park, a popular regional resort, operated until the mid 1960s. Today the lake area has become the water recreation center of central Ohio, providing boating, swimming, fishing, water skiing, golfing, picnicking, and ice sports. The lake extends into three counties - Fairfield, Licking and Perry.
 
Erected
Buckeye Lake Marker (side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 19, 2008
2. Buckeye Lake Marker (side B)
2002 by Greater Buckeye Lake Historical Society and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 13-45.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio and Erie Canal, and the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 55.706′ N, 82° 29.381′ W. Marker is in Buckeye Lake, Ohio, in Licking County. Marker is at the intersection of Walnut Road (Ohio Route 79) and Cottage Street, on the right when traveling east on Walnut Road. Touch for map. Marker is on grounds of the Greater Buckeye Lake Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 4729 Walnut Road, Buckeye Lake OH 43008, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Buckeye Lake Park ( approx. 0.7 miles away); Buckeye Lake Amusement Park ( approx. 0.7 miles away); Hebron Mill ( approx. 2.3 miles away); Hebron ( approx. 2.3 miles away); Hebron Milling Company ( approx. 2.3 miles away); a different marker also named Hebron ( approx. 2.3 miles away); Hebron Veterans Memorial ( approx. 2.4 miles away); Millersport World War II Memorial ( approx. 3.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Buckeye Lake.
 
Categories. Colonial EraEntertainmentNatural FeaturesNotable PlacesWaterways & Vessels
 
Buckeye Lake Museum and Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 19, 2008
3. Buckeye Lake Museum and Marker
Greater Buckeye Lake Museum Land Donation Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 19, 2008
4. Greater Buckeye Lake Museum Land Donation Marker
Jack and Marge Goodin donated this land to the Greater Buckeye Lake Historical Society to be used as the site for the Historical Museum. December, 1995
Log House at Greater Buckeye Lake Museum image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., October 19, 2008
5. Log House at Greater Buckeye Lake Museum
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 25, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,336 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 25, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   4, 5. submitted on October 27, 2008, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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