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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mount Pleasant in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War

 
 
A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones
1. A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker
Inscription.  As dust from the Civil War settled, the nation's capital entered a new phase of growth. The expanding government needed more workers, who in turn needed more housing. An entrepreneur named Samuel Brown bought a large tract of land outside Washington, named it Mount Pleasant, and began building. Other government workers bought land nearby, and soon Mount Pleasant developed into a small community, separated from downtown Washington by a wide belt of farm and forest. Horse-drawn transport linked Mount Pleasant to jobs downtown, and by the mid-1870s the neighborhood featured a church and a school, where neighbors gathered to discuss the day's pressing issues.

A few of the original Victorian houses from this time still stand on and north of Park Road. The oldest surviving example, built by Samuel Brown in 1871, is located at 3423 Oakwood Terrace.

Art on Call is a program of Cultural Tourism DC with support from:
DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities
Office of the Deputy Mayor for Economic Development
District Department of Transportation

This call box is also supported by:
Historic Mount Pleasant
National
A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
2. A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker
Endowment for the Arts
Mount Pleasant Advisory Neighborhood Commission 1-D
Jeff and Linn

Michael K. Ross, Sculptor
www.historicmountpleasant.org

 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC. (Marker Number 4.)
 
Location. 38° 55.787′ N, 77° 2.472′ W. Marker is in Mount Pleasant, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on 18th Street Northwest near Kenyon Street Northwest, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3101 18th Street Northwest, Washington DC 20010, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Harvest at Pleasant Plains (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); At Home and Abroad (about 700 feet away); The First Bodega (approx. 0.2 miles away); Changing Fashions (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mount Pleasant Street, ca. 2004 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Streetcar Suburb (approx. 0.2 miles away); Defying the Restrictive Covenants (approx. 0.2 miles away); Main Street (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Mount Pleasant.
 
Categories. Roads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
3. A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker
A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 13, 2018
4. A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War Marker
Map on marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones
5. Map on marker
 
More. Search the internet for A Village Comes to Life: Mount Pleasant after the Civil War.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 21, 2019. This page originally submitted on January 13, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 11 times this year. Last updated on March 8, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on January 13, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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