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Fort Edward in Washington County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Hudson River at Fort Edward

Native Americans

 
 
The Hudson River at Fort Edward Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, May 18, 2019
1. The Hudson River at Fort Edward Marker
Inscription.  
Archaeological excavations in the Fort Edward region have shown that Native Americans have lived here for at least 8,000 years, and probably as long as 11,000-12,000 years. The Hudson River, as well as several lakes and streams in the area supplied fertile land for Native American settlements. The Mohicans occupied this land , which stretched from the New York City to Lake George. They had a symbiotic relationship with their land which resulted in a ecologically balanced environment.

Women were in charge of all aspects of farming. Men were in charge of other aspects of life necessary for survival, such as hunting. The Mohicans often used hunting techniques such as performing drives and creating snares and other traps. Nets were used for catching fish.

Structures such as wigwams served as housing for the Mohicans. Tree bark covered the outside of these dwellings, furs and mats lined the interior to provide insulation. Temporary shelters, such as lean-tos were often found at prime hunting and fishing spots. If villages relocated, then the land was left to grow back to its original natural state.

Lower inset
In
The Hudson River at Fort Edward Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, May 18, 2019
2. The Hudson River at Fort Edward Marker
the early 1600s, the Mohicans crossed paths with Europeans explorers. The fur trade flourished with the arrival of the the Europeans, but along with them came diseases such as smallpox, diphtheria, and scarlet fever. Between disease and European conflicits, the Mohicans eventually left the area. As colonization expanded, Native Americans nations throughout the country were driven from their homes and pushed west by European settlers. The effects of Native American displacement can still be seen today, as the majority of present-day Mohicans now live in Wisconsin, with only a few remaining in the eastern part of the country.
 
Erected by Glen Falls Foundation, Hudson River Improvement Fund, Sandy Hill Foundation.
 
Location. 43° 15.894′ N, 73° 35.276′ W. Marker is in Fort Edward, New York, in Washington County. Marker is on Rogers Island Drive, in the median. In the median at the loop. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Edward NY 12828, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Hudson River at Fort Edward, NY (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Hudson River at Fort Edward (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Hudson River at Fort Edward, NY
The Hudson River at Fort Edward Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, May 18, 2019
3. The Hudson River at Fort Edward Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Hudson River at Fort Edward, NY (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Edward War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Jane McCrea (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rogers Island - Fort Edward, NY (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Rogers Island - Fort Edward, NY (about 300 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Edward.
 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on May 29, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 27, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 45 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 27, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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