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Baltimore, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Loudon Park National Cemetery

 
 
Loudon Park National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 9, 2019
1. Loudon Park National Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  
National Cemetery (center panel)
In December 1861, the U.S. Sanitary Commission designated a small area of Loudon Park Cemetery for the burial of Union soldiers who died in Baltimore hospitals. The half-acre lot in the northeast corner of this private cemetery became one of the first national cemeteries.

By 1874, an estimated 1,646 Union soldiers and five civilians lay here. In 1884, the remains of approximately 238 U.S. Colored Troops were relocated from a government lot in Baltimore's Laurel Cemetery to the national cemetery. Five notable Union monuments were installed between 1885 and 1898.

Confederate Dead
In 1912, the Commission for Marking Graves of Confederate Dead identified 256 imprisoned soldiers and civilians who died in the Baltimore area during the Civil War. Twenty-nine, originally buried at Fort McHenry, had been reinterred at the national cemetery. The commission could not locate these graves, so it erected one granite monument with a bronze tablet listing the soldiers’ names.

Civil War Baltimore (left panel)
Slavery was legal in Maryland, but the
Marker detail: Massachusetts troops entering Baltimore<br>c. 1861 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
2. Marker detail: Massachusetts troops entering Baltimore
c. 1861
state was divided over secession and the Civil War. President Abraham Lincoln called for volunteers to suppress the Confederate rebellion on April 15, 1861. Four days later, Massachusetts troops stopped in Baltimore en route to the U.S. capital. Pro-Confederate residents shouted insults, threw rocks, and otherwise attacked the soldiers. The soldiers fired into the crowd, killing dozens of civilians and wounding many more. On May 13, Lincoln ordered Union forces to occupy Baltimore. They remained throughout the war. Fort McHenry in Baltimore Harbor became a prison for disloyal Maryland civilians and captured Confederate soldiers.

Pro-Union Baltimore supported the war. Escaped slaves made their way to Maryland where many enlisted in the 4th U.S. Colored Infantry. Thousands of soldiers trained in and around the city. Sick and wounded soldiers were treated at Jarvis U.S. General Hospital, the Steuart Mansion, and other facilities.

Medal of Honor Recipients (right panel)
Two Civil War recipients of the Medal of Honor are buried in the cemetery. First bestowed in 1863, it is the highest award for military valor in the U.S. Armed Services. For acts above and beyond the call of duty, 1,522 individuals who served in the Civil War received the medal.

Pvt. James T. Jennings, 56th Pennsylvania Infantry, captured the flag of the 55th North
Marker detail: Civil War Medal of Honor image. Click for full size.
3. Marker detail: Civil War Medal of Honor
Carolina Infantry at Petersburg, Virginia, on August 20, 1864. Jennings died at Jarvis U.S. General Hospital on March 22, 1865 (Section A, Grave 1410).

Second Lt. William Taylor, 1st Maryland Infantry, burned a bridge at Front Royal, Virginia, in May 1862 to prevent a Confederate pursuit. On August 20, 1864, he replaced a wounded officer at Petersburg and led a reconnaissance mission (Officers Section, Grave 16).
 
Erected by U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, National Cemetery Administration.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Cemeteries marker series.
 
Location. 39° 16.867′ N, 76° 40.512′ W. Marker is in Baltimore, Maryland. Marker can be reached from Frederick Avenue (Maryland Route 144) west of McCurley Street, on the right when traveling east. Marker is located about 20 yards inside the gate, on the left side as you enter Loudon Park National Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3445 Frederick Avenue, Baltimore MD 21229, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A National Cemetery System (here, next to this marker); Address by President Lincoln (here, next to this marker); Maryland Sons Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Maryland Naval Monument
Marker detail: Jarvis U.S. General Hospital, c. 1864 image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Marker detail: Jarvis U.S. General Hospital, c. 1864
(within shouting distance of this marker); To the Memory of the Unknown Dead (within shouting distance of this marker); Burial Place of Twenty-Nine Confederate Soldiers (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Mary Pickersgill (approx. 0.2 miles away); Weiskittel Mausoleum (approx. Ό mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Baltimore.
 
Regarding Loudon Park National Cemetery. National Register of Historic Places #96000655
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Loudon Park National Cemetery
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesPatriots & PatriotismWar, US Civil
 
Marker detail: Maryland Sons Monument (right), and Maryland Naval Monument (left), 1908 image. Click for full size.
National Archives and Records Administration
5. Marker detail: Maryland Sons Monument (right), and Maryland Naval Monument (left), 1908
Loudon Park Cemetery (adjacent private cemetery) is visible in the background (looking west).
Loudon Park National Cemetery Marker<br>(<i>related marker on right • office in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 9, 2019
6. Loudon Park National Cemetery Marker
(related marker on right • office in background)
Loudon Park National Cemetery Entrance (<i>wide view looking south from Frederick Avenue</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 9, 2019
7. Loudon Park National Cemetery Entrance (wide view looking south from Frederick Avenue)
Marker is obscured • about 10 yards behind the flag pole
Loudon Park National Cemetery plaque<br>(<i>mounted on right side of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 9, 2019
8. Loudon Park National Cemetery plaque
(mounted on right side of entrance)
Loudon Park National Cemetery<br>National Register of Historic Places plaque image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 9, 2019
9. Loudon Park National Cemetery
National Register of Historic Places plaque
This National Cemetery
has been listed in the
National Register
of
Historic Places

by the
U.S. Department of the Interior
1996
Notable Loudon Park National Cemetery Monuments (<i>view looking south from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, June 9, 2019
10. Notable Loudon Park National Cemetery Monuments (view looking south from near marker)
left to right:
• Civil War Monument
• Unknown Dead Monument
• Maryland Sons Monument
• Maryland Naval Monument
 

More. Search the internet for Loudon Park National Cemetery.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on June 9, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 63 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on June 9, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   3. submitted on June 10, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on June 9, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   8, 9, 10. submitted on June 10, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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