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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Defense of Dogan Ridge

 
 
The Defense of Dogan Ridge Marker image. Click for full size.
June 16, 2007
1. The Defense of Dogan Ridge Marker
Inscription. On the afternoon of August 30, 1862, the rolling fields of John Dogan’s farm, “Rosefield,” formed a crucial defensive position for General John Pope’s Union Army of Virginia. As General James Longstreet’s Confederate attack swept onto Chinn Ridge, Union commanders here attempted to stave off impending disaster. Northern artillerists, commanding more than 40 guns along the ridge, dueled with Southern gunners near Groveton and delayed Longstreet’s advance south of the Warrenton Turnpike.
 
Location. 38° 49.049′ N, 77° 32.09′ W. Marker is near Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker can be reached from Warrenton Turnpike (U.S. 29), on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in the Manassas National Battlefield Park at the end of a private (National Park Service) driveway extending northwest from the Warrenton Turnpike (U.S Route 29). Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Federal Artillery Positions (approx. 0.3 miles away); Retreat from Chinn Ridge (approx. 0.4 miles away); Battlefield of Bull Run or First Manassas (approx. 0.4 miles away); Visions of Victory
The Defense of Dogan Ridge Marker image. Click for full size.
June 16, 2007
2. The Defense of Dogan Ridge Marker
Looking southwest from the crest of Dogan Ridge overlooking the Warrenton Turnpike (U.S. Route 29) about 80 yards to the south.
(approx. half a mile away); Blocking the Union Advance (approx. half a mile away); Stone House – Battlefield Landmark (approx. half a mile away); Vision of Victory (was approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing. ); Matthews Hill (was approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left of the marker is a sketch captioned, Based on a sketch by Edwin Forbes of the Union position on Dogan Ridge, as viewed from Henry Hill on August 30. The orchard at the Dogan House, in the center of the view, became a collection point for Union wounded after the battle. The house, destroyed during the war, was replaced by the present building in the late 19th century.

On the lower middle of the marker is a portrait captioned, Major General Franz Sigel
From his command post at Dogan House, First Corps commander Franz Sigel dispatched reinforcements to the fighting on Chinn Ridge and Henry Hill.


On the upper right of the marker is a map captioned, The Repulse of Law’s Attack
About 6 p.m. on August 30,
Close-up of Map on Marker image. Click for full size.
June 16, 2007
3. Close-up of Map on Marker
Colonel Evander Law’s Confederates drove the 45th New York regiment up the slope of Dogan Ridge. Wisconsin troops under Brigadier General John Gibbon then counterattacked through the Dogan orchard and turned back Law’s troops on the hillside, while Captain Hubert Dilger’s 1st Ohio Light artillery battery lent support. After this sharp encounter, Pope’s troops withdrew in good order from Dogan Ridge eastward along the Warrenton Turnpike toward Stone Bridge.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
View of 1880s Dogan House from Chinn Ridge image. Click for full size.
March 3, 2007
4. View of 1880s Dogan House from Chinn Ridge
Looking west-northwest across the Warrenton Turnpike (U.S. Route 29) from the northern edge of Chinn Ridge. Dogan House and buildings are in center of photo partly screened by trees.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on December 6, 2008. This page has been viewed 838 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on December 6, 2008. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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