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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Granger

Manning the Fort

 
 
Fort Granger Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
1. Fort Granger Marker
Inscription.  Located along Figuers Bluff overlooking the Harpeth River, this Federal fort, named for Union Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger, was well situated to control transportation in and out of Franklin. U.S. Corps of Engineers Capt. William E. Merrill supervised the fort’s construction beginning early in 1863.

By that time, the Federal occupation of Middle Tennessee was entering its second year. Numerous small engagements had already taken place in and around Truine, Franklin, Brentwood, Nolensville, Thompson’s Station, and Spring Hill. In February, Union Gen. William S. Rosecrans ordered Granger to build the Franklin fort to protect the railroad and garrison the town. In March, Granger reported, “Fortifications will be done in about one week. About 10 days’ rations, and one hundred and fifty to each man on hand. No infantry coming in. Good night; am sick and tired out … had no sleep for a week.” The fort took ten weeks to complete.

Ft. Granger housed 7,9000 Federal soldiers and 2,7000 cavalrymen. Multiple campsites, drill fields, sentry posts, and storage facilities dotted once open fields northeast and west of the fort, including
Fort Granger Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
2. Fort Granger Marker
The marker is the one on the right.
barracks in the town. A contraband camp for escaped slaves stood near the fort.

Battery crews drilled at least once a week, firing the cannons for practice. On April 10, 1863, the battery used the cannons in combat during a Franklin reconnaissance raid by Confederate Gens. Nathan B. Forrest and Earl Van Dorn. By May, Fort Granger contained 6 large siege guns (including two 24-pounder howitzers) and 24 smaller field cannon. On June 4-5 the guns defended against Confederate cavalry on the outskirts of town.

By mid-1863, Rosecrans had moved much of his army to Tullahoma. Detached regiments continued to man the fort from June 1863 to May 1865. During the Battle of Franklin on November 30, 1864, Union Gen. John M. Schofield observed the fighting from Fort Granger.
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 55.524′ N, 86° 51.566′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Eddy Lane south of Fort Granger Drive, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Fort Granger Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Fort Granger (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Fort Granger (approx. 0.3 miles away);
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
3. Inset
Gen. Gordon Granger
a different marker also named Fort Granger (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fort Granger Federal Garrison (approx. 0.3 miles away); Retreat Action at Franklin (approx. 0.3 miles away); Franklin Cotton Factory and Foundry / Lillie Mills (approx. 0.3 miles away); Franklin Railroad Depot (approx. 0.4 miles away); Riverview (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .  Gordon Granger at Wikipedia. (Submitted on November 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.)
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US Civil
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 17, 2019
4. Inset
Emplaced siege guns
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Granger.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 10, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 37 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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