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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Moundsville in Marshall County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod

 
 
Moundsville face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 18, 2009
1. Moundsville face of Marker
Inscription. Moundsville. Named for Grave Creek Mound. This mound, 900 feet around, 70 feet high, is the largest conical mound in America. The inscribed stone found in it has never been deciphered. Near by was the Indian fort built by Joseph Tomlinson.

Capt. James Harrod. Capt. James Harrod assembled 31 men at the mouth of Grave Creek in the spring of 1774 and from this point went to Kentucky. Their settlement at Harrodsburg was halted while they joined Capt. Christian’s company in Dunmore’s War.
 
Location. 39° 55.116′ N, 80° 44.742′ W. Marker is in Moundsville, West Virginia, in Marshall County. Marker is on 7th Street east of Lafayette Avenue (West Virginia Route 2), on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moundsville WV 26041, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Benjamin C. Criswell (a few steps from this marker); Civil War Cannons (a few steps from this marker); Old Brick School House (within shouting distance of this marker); Marshall County Commemorates Service Men and Women (within shouting distance of this marker); Volunteers in the Spanish-American War
Capt. James Harrod Face of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 18, 2009
2. Capt. James Harrod Face of Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Recipients of the Purple Heart (within shouting distance of this marker); Grave Creek Mound (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); West Virginia Penitentiary (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Moundsville.
 
Regarding Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod. Dunmore’s War was a war from 1774 to 1775 between the Colony of Virginia and the Indian nations of the Shawnee and Mingo. John Murray, the 4th Earl of Dunmore was the Governor of Virginia.
 
Also see . . .
1. Grave Creek Mound Archaeological Complex. “The most impressive and largest Adena mound, Grave Creek Mound is the largest conical type of any of the mound builder structures. Construction of the mound took place in successive stages from about 250-150 B.C., as indicated by the multiple burials at different levels within the structures. In 1838, road engineers measured its height at 69 feet and its at the base as 295 feet. Originally a moat of about 40 feet in width and five feet in depth with one causeway encircled it.” (Submitted on June 30, 2009.) 

2. James Harrod.
Marshall County Court House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 18, 2009
3. Marshall County Court House and Marker
Wikipedia entry. “In 1774, Harrod was ordered by Lord Dunmore to lead an expedition to survey the bounds of land promised by the British crown to soldiers who served in the French and Indian War. Leaving from Fort Redstone, Harrod and 37 men traveled down the Monongahela and Ohio Rivers to the mouth of the Kentucky River, eventually crossing Salt River into what is today Mercer County, Kentucky. On June 16, 1774, the men established the first pioneer settlement in Kentucky, Harrod’s Town. The men divided the land amongst them; Harrod chose an area about six miles from the settlement proper, which he named Boiling Springs. Just as Harrod’s men had completed the settlement’s first structures, Dunmore dispatched Daniel Boone to call them back from the frontier and into military service against the Indians in Lord Dunmore’s War. Harrod enlisted in the militia, but arrived too late to participate in the war’s only major battle—the Battle of Point Pleasant. His men arrived at the battle site at midnight on October 10, the day the fighting ended.” (Submitted on June 30, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar, French and Indian
 
Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2011
4. Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker
View of historic marker looking east along 7th Street, towards the Civil War Cannon.
Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2011
5. Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker
View of the historic marker looking south across 7th Street.
Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2011
6. Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker
View looking north of the south side of the Moundsville Mound.
Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2011
7. Moundsville / Capt. James Harrod Marker
View of the Moundsville Mound as seen from Tomlinson Avenue, just south of the intersection with 8th Street.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 29, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 991 times since then and 54 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on June 29, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4, 5. submitted on April 28, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6, 7. submitted on April 26, 2012, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
 
Editor’s want-list for this marker. Photos of the Mound • Can you help?
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