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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Morgantown in Monongalia County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Monongalia County War Memorial

 
 
Monongalia County War Memorial Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
1. Monongalia County War Memorial Marker
Inscription. In memory of Monongalia's sons “They fought for the freedom of others.”

In memory of “Our Sons” who fought for the freedom of the world, 1917-1918

In memory of “Our Women” who sacrificed for the freedom of the world, 1917-1918

“In memory of Monongalia's Sons, who fought for liberty. Rest in Peace.”

Defenders of the Union, 1861-1865 Spanish American War 1898
 
Location. 39° 37.359′ N, 79° 57.803′ W. Marker is in Morgantown, West Virginia, in Monongalia County. Marker is on Dorsey Avenue, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is on hilltop in Oak Grove Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1291 Dorsey Avenue, Morgantown WV 26501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Monongalia Arts Center (approx. half a mile away); Morgantown (approx. half a mile away); Old Stone House (approx. 0.6 miles away); Monongalia County Courthouse (approx. 0.6 miles away); Old Iron Works (approx. 0.6 miles away); First Pottery (approx. 0.6 miles away); VFW Post 548 Veterans Memorials (approx. 0.8 miles away); Seneca Glass Company (approx. 1.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Morgantown.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesMilitaryPatriots & PatriotismWar, Spanish-AmericanWar, US CivilWar, World I
 
Monongalia County War Memorial Southwest Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
2. Monongalia County War Memorial Southwest Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Southeast Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
3. Monongalia County War Memorial Southeast Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Northwest Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
4. Monongalia County War Memorial Northwest Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Northeast Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
5. Monongalia County War Memorial Northeast Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Southwest Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
6. Monongalia County War Memorial Southwest Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Southeast Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
7. Monongalia County War Memorial Southeast Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Northwest Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
8. Monongalia County War Memorial Northwest Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial Northeast Facade image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
9. Monongalia County War Memorial Northeast Facade
Monongalia County War Memorial image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
10. Monongalia County War Memorial
Looking north.
Monongalia County War Memorial Statue image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
11. Monongalia County War Memorial Statue
Monongalia County War Memorial Cannon image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 31, 2009
12. Monongalia County War Memorial Cannon
This gun is a 12-pdr Light Field Gun, commonly known as a "Napoleon." It is registry number 369, produced by Revere Copper of Boston, Massachusetts in 1864. It was inspected by Thomas J. Rodman and weighed 1239 pounds when first issued.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 10, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,067 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12. submitted on July 10, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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