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San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse

San Francisco Landmark No. 229

 
 
The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2009
1. The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse Marker
Inscription. At this location, on July 3, 1934, a dramatic clash occured, one that eventually touched the nation. Longshoremen, sailors, teamsters, and other waterfront workers had closed down Pacific coast shipping since May, in what came to be known as "The Big Strike". Business interests and employers, attempting to break the strike, or "open the port", formed the Industrial Association, and created the Atlas Drayage Company, which then rented space in this building, Garcia & Maggini Warehouse. On July 3, trucks under heavy police guard began to move goods from Pier 38 to this entrance. The photo shows the first truck arriving. Although their picket line had been pushed aside at Pier 38, the strikers regrouped here and resisted the movement of trucks during a five-hour pitched battle. Violence continued at the waterfront. On July 5, known as Bloody Thursday, two workers were shot. On July 9, a massive Market Street funeral march honored the martyrs. A three day general strike followed, leading to a new role for labor.
Fund for Labor Culture & History
 
Erected by Fund for Labor Culture and History.
 
Location. 37° 46.759′ N, 122° 23.437′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County
Garcia and Maggini Warehouse Marker - Wide Shot image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2009
2. Garcia and Maggini Warehouse Marker - Wide Shot
. Marker is on 136 King Street near Second Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: San Francisco CA 94107, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Southbeach Shoreline – 1852 (within shouting distance of this marker); King Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); California Electric Building (about 500 feet away); Steamboat Point (about 500 feet away); Shipbuilding at Steamboat Point (about 800 feet away); Ghost Ship - Lydia (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jack London (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rammaytush (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Francisco.
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted on the wall about 15 feet to the left of the entrance. The location is directly across the street from AT&T stadium.
 
Regarding The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse.

The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse was recognized as a San Francisco City Landmark on May 24, 2002.

The warehouse was constructed in 1913.

The two men shot and killed on July 5th, 1934 were Howard S. Sperry, a striking longshoreman, and Nickolas Bordoise, an unemployed fry cook. The San Francisco Chronicle noted that their funeral procession on July 9th included 15,000
The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2009
3. The Garcia and Maggini Warehouse
men and women marching.

 
Also see . . .  Anniversary of a Dark Day. Carl Nolte's San Francisco Chronicle article on the 75th anniversary of Bloody Thursday and the effect it had on the city. (Submitted on July 28, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Labor UnionsNotable BuildingsNotable Events
 
Garcia and Maggini Warehouse - July 3, 1934 image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 12, 2009
4. Garcia and Maggini Warehouse - July 3, 1934
Closeup of photo on the marker depicting the events described thereon. (Image on marker provided courtesy of the San Francisco Chronicle).
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 28, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,106 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 28, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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