Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fairmont in Marion County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender

 
 
David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
1. David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker
Inscription. David Morgan (1721–1813). Son of Col. Morgan Morgan. Surveyed with Washington for Fairfax Stone; explored with Boone & Gist. Settled here in 1771. Surveyed Pleasantville (Rivesville) 1776. Upriver on his nearby 361-acre River see, he established Pettyjohn with ferry, mail drop, trading post, and home (exant) with salt works.

Patriot, Defender. David Morgan, soldier French & Indian War, serving at Fort Necessity and in Braddock and Forbes Expeditions. Soldier in Revolutionary War. Provided drill grounds at Pettyjohn. Surveyed Pricketts Fort and southwest Virginia. Justice of the peace. Noted for saving two of his children in a fight with two Indians.
 
Erected 2008 by City of Fairmont & Marion County Commission, and West Virginia Archives & History.
 
Location. 39° 28.783′ N, 80° 8.75′ W. Marker is in Fairmont, West Virginia, in Marion County. Marker is at the intersection of 3rd Street (West Virginia Route 310) and Virginia Avenue, on the left when traveling south on 3rd Street. Touch for map. Marker is just past the west end of the Monongahela River bridge next to the Marion County Rescue Squad. Marker is in this post office area: Fairmont WV 26554, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers
David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
2. David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker
are within walking distance of this marker. The Colonel George S. “Spanky” Roberts, USAF Memorial Bridge (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Cemetery (approx. ¼ mile away); First Father’s Day Service (approx. 0.3 miles away); A. Brooks Fleming House (approx. 0.3 miles away); High-Level / Million Dollar Robert H. Mollohan Bridge (approx. 0.4 miles away); Boaz Fleming (approx. 0.4 miles away); Marion County Courthouse (approx. 0.4 miles away); Fairmont (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fairmont.
 
Also see . . .  David Morgan and the Two Indians. 1962 article by Jack B. Moore. “. . . The white man is upwards of sixty years of age, his name is David Morgan, a kinsman to col. Morgan, of the rifle battalion. This man had through fear of the Indians, fled to a fort about twenty miles above the province line, and near the east side of the Monongahela river. From thence he sent some of his younger children to his plantation, which was about a mile distant, there to do some business in the field. He afterwards thought fit to follow, and see how they fared. Getting to his field and seating himself upon the fence, within view of his children, where they were at work, he espied two Indians making towards them: on which he called to his children to make their escape, for there were
David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
3. David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker
Indians. The Indians immediately bent their course towards him. He made the best haste to escape away, that his age and consequent infirmity would permit: but soon found he would be overtaken, which made him think of defense. Being armed with a good rifle, he faced about and found himself under the necessity of running four or five perches towards the Indians, in order to obtain shelter behind a tree of sufficient size. . . ” (Submitted on August 1, 2009.) 
 
Categories. Colonial EraSettlements & SettlersWar, French and IndianWar, US Revolutionary
 
David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 23, 2009
4. David Morgan (1721–1813) / Patriot, Defender Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 1, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,286 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 1, 2009, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.
Paid Advertisement