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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Memphis in Shelby County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Elmwood Cemetery

 
 
Elmwood Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, July 28, 2009
1. Elmwood Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Elmwood Cemetery was established on August 28, 1852. Buried here are Memphis pioneer families: 14 Confederate generals; victims of the Yellow Fever epidemic of 1878; Governors Isham G. Harris and James C. Jones; U.S. Senators Kenneth D. McKellar, Thomas B. Turley, and Stephen Adams, who succeeded Jefferson Davis in the Senate; E.H. Crump, prominent political leader for decades, along with 21 other mayors of Memphis; and Robert Church, the South's first black millionaire.
 
Erected by Tennessee Historical Commission. (Marker Number 4E 72.)
 
Location. 35° 7.451′ N, 90° 1.774′ W. Marker is in Memphis, Tennessee, in Shelby County. Marker can be reached from South Dudley Street half a mile south of E.H. Crump Boulevard (U.S. 78), on the left. Touch for map. Enter Elmwood Cemetery through gates and over bridge. Marker is adjacent (right side) to visitor center which is found immediately to your left when you cross entry bridge. Marker is at or near this postal address: 824 South Dudley Street, Memphis TN 38104, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Captain Kit Dalton (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Soldiers Rest (approx. 0.2 miles away); Edward Shaw
Elmwood Cemetery Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, July 28, 2009
2. Elmwood Cemetery Entrance
(approx. half a mile away); Hollis Freeman Price, Sr. (approx. half a mile away); Benjamin Albert Imes (approx. half a mile away); Second Congregational Church (approx. half a mile away); The Memphis 13/Bruce Elementary (approx. 0.7 miles away); Annesdale Park Subdivision (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Memphis.
 
Also see . . .  Elmwood Cemetery Website. (Submitted on August 2, 2009, by Mary Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York.)
 
Additional comments.
1.
Elmwood Cemetery was one of the first rural garden cemeteries in the US south and presently has 75,000 people buried there in its 80+ acres. The cemetery is characterized by its ancient oaks, magnolias and elms which shade the property and provide a fitting backdrop for this historic site.

A one hour driving audio tour is available which provides an excellent story about those buried here and the events surrounding these individuals.
    — Submitted August 2, 2009, by Mary
No Man's Land image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, July 28, 2009
3. No Man's Land
In commeration of all victims who perished in the yellow fever epidemics of the 1870's.
Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York.

 
Additional keywords. Memphis at rest since 1852, Historic Cemetery, Civil War Cemetery, Yellow Fever Epidemic
 
Categories. African AmericansAntebellum South, USCemeteries & Burial SitesMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
Confederate Soldiers Rest image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, July 28, 2009
4. Confederate Soldiers Rest
Marker located within the Elmwood Cemetery Property.
Confederate Dead Monument and Confederate Flag image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, July 28, 2009
5. Confederate Dead Monument and Confederate Flag
Located behind Confederate Soldiers Rest marker
Herman Frank Arnold grave with Original Score of Dixie inscription image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan, July 28, 2009
6. Herman Frank Arnold grave with Original Score of Dixie inscription
Elmwood Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mary Ellen Coghlan
7. Elmwood Cemetery Marker
Cemetery Map. No man's Land is #8 Confederate marker #13
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 2, 2009, by Mary Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York. This page has been viewed 2,761 times since then and 52 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 2, 2009, by Mary Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York.   7. submitted on August 5, 2009, by Mary Ellen Coghlan of Warwick, New York. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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