Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Wayne in Allen County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Battle of Kekionga

 
 
The Battle of Kekionga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2009
1. The Battle of Kekionga Marker
Inscription. The Battle of Kekionga in October 1790 was the fist battle fought by the United States Army after the War for Independence. The campaign had been ordered by President Washington against the Miami settlement of Kekionga, the center of Indian resistance to U.S. migration across the Ohio River.

On October 17, the U.S. commander, General Josiah Harmar, reached Kekionga with 1,453 regular and militia soldiers and found that the Miami had burned and abandoned their town. General Harmar sent several companies north of Kekionga to search for the Miami warriors, but the U.S. forces suffered a stinging defeat on October 19 in an ambush led by the Miami war chief Little Turtle near his Eel River settlement. General Harmar retreated from Kekionga to a camp located nine miles to the south.

Learning that the Miami had returned to Kekionga, General Harmar sent an attacking force back to the Indian town on the morning of October 22. Two companies of U.S. forces took position along the west bank of the St. Joseph River while three companies advanced across the ford of the Maumee River at this spot, hoping to entrap the Indians. The Miami warriors challenged the crossing, killing several men as they waded the ankle-deep Maumee River. In the corn fields and flood plain outside Kekionga, the main United States forces were destroyed
The Battle of Kekionga Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 20, 2009
2. The Battle of Kekionga Marker
View of historical marker in the foreground, with a view of historical marker for the "Battle of Harmar's Ford" in the background, and a view looking east on Edgewater Avenue along the levee built on the north bank of the Maumee River.
and Major Wyllys and Major Fontaine were killed by Little Turtle's warriors who held the ground to the north. By the end of the battle, 183 United States soldiers had been killed, about the same number of Indians had been slain. The Miami held their town, and General Harmar's main force retreated to Fort Washington (Cincinnati).
 
Erected by the Journal-Gazette Foundation.
 
Location. 41° 5.015′ N, 85° 7.542′ W. Marker is in Fort Wayne, Indiana, in Allen County. Marker is at the intersection of Edgewater Avenue and Dearborn Street, on the left when traveling west on Edgewater Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Wayne IN 46805, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Battle of Harmar's Ford (here, next to this marker); Kekionga (approx. mile away); The Site of General Wayne's Fort (approx. 0.4 miles away); Old Fort Wayne Well (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Last Two American Forts/The Siege of 1812 (approx. half a mile away); William Wells (approx. half a mile away); Pirogue Landing (approx. half a mile away); Mother George (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Wayne.
 
Also see . . .
1. Harmar's Defeat. This link is published and made available by, "Ohio History Central," an online encyclopedia of Ohio History. (Submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Ohio's Native American Wars. This web link was both published and made available by, "Touring Ohio." (Submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Wikipedia entry for Josiah Harmar. (Submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.)
 
Categories. MilitaryNative AmericansNotable EventsWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 3,379 times since then and 141 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 9, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement