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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Burkittsville in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Medal of Honor Recipients

 
 
Medal of Honor Recipients Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 19, 2007
1. Medal of Honor Recipients Marker
Inscription. In July 1862 Congress authorized the president to present medals to soldiers of the United States Army for gallant and meritorious service. On September 14, 1862, two soldiers so distinguished themselves during the fighting at Crampton’s Gap that they would later be awarded this “Congressional Medal of Honor.”

The 4th Vermont pursued Munford’s retreating Virginians from the stone wall near the foot of South Mountain to an unused wagon track on the eastern slope of the mountain. Once there, First Lieutenant George W. Hooker led four companies south to silence the Confederate guns still firing from Brownsville Pass. Hooker, riding ahead of his men, came upon a gathering of Confederate soldiers. Acting alone, he confronted 116 men of the 16th Virginia. He told the Confederates that a large force was near and convinced them to surrender. Hooker received the Medal of Honor in 1891.

To the north, at Whipp’s Ravine, Privates James Allen and James Richards, 16th New York, became separated from their unit. As they neared the foot of the mountain, a bullet struck Richards’ left leg. Allen found a comfortable spot for Richards and followed the retreating Confederates.

“By this time...the only thing for me to do was climb also. As I drew myself up, I was met by another volley, but was only slightly wounded.
Six Blue and Gray Markers at Crampton's Gap image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 21, 2007
2. Six Blue and Gray Markers at Crampton's Gap
The Medal of Honor marker is on the far right.
Putting on a bold face, and waving my arms, I said to my imaginary company, ‘Up men, up!’ The Rebels [of the 16th Georgia] thinking they were cornered, stacked their arms.... I made haste to get between them and the guns and found I had fourteen prisoners and a flag from the color guard.”

Allen became a corporal that day and received the Medal of Honor in 1890.

Presented to the people of the United States in memory of Captain James Colwell by his Colwell descendants.
 
Erected by Blue & Gray Educational Society / State of Maryland Department of Natural Resources.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.
 
Location. 39° 24.312′ N, 77° 38.364′ W. Marker is near Burkittsville, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Gapland Raod and Arnoldstown Road, on the left when traveling west on Gapland Raod. Touch for map. Across the road from the War Correspondent’s Memorial Arch, in Gathland State Park. Marker is in this post office area: Burkittsville MD 21718, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Troup Light Artillery (here, next to this marker); Padgett’s Field: Confederate Last Stand (here, next to
Medal of Honor Recipients Marker image. Click for full size.
By Don Morfe
3. Medal of Honor Recipients Marker
James Allen is mentioned in the marker above. He is buried in Oakland Cemetery, St Paul MN, Block 46, Lot 34. The grave GPS coordinates are N44.9706 W93.0966. MEDAL OF HONOR CITATION: ALLEN, JAMES Rank and organization: Private, Company F, 16th New York Infantry. Place and date: At South Mountain, Md., 14 September 1862. Entered service at: Potsdam, N.Y. Born: 6 May 1843, Ireland. Date of issue: 11 September 1890. Citation: Single-handed and slightly wounded he accosted a squad of 14 Confederate soldiers bearing the colors of the 16th Georgia Infantry (C.S.A.). By an imaginary ruse he secured their surrender and kept them at bay when the regimental commander discovered him and rode away for assistance.
this marker); Burial: A Most Disagreeable Task (here, next to this marker); The Stage is Set (here, next to this marker); Bartlett Leads the Way (here, next to this marker); Journalists Who Gave Their Lives (within shouting distance of this marker); GATH: The Man and His Mountain (within shouting distance of this marker); Gath's Empty Tomb (within shouting distance of this marker); Mausoleum (within shouting distance of this marker); Mell Rifles & Troup Light Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Burkittsville.
 
More about this marker. On the left side, the marker displays a drawing of Allen's action, “Allen’s commander, Lieutenant Colonel Joel J. Seaver, scans Allen’s prisoners.” On the right are pictures of George W. Hooker (standing with other officers) and James Allen.
 
Also see . . .
1. Lieutenant George W Hooker and the Medal of Honor. (Submitted on August 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Short Biography of Lieutenant Hooker. (Submitted on August 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Crampton’s Gap Medals of Honor. Details both Hooker’s and Allen’s actions. (Submitted on August 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,438 times since then and 45 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on January 18, 2013, by Don Morfe of Baltimore, Md 21234. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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