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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winder in Barrow County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Fort Yargo

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Fort Yargo Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 11, 2009
1. Fort Yargo Marker
Inscription. This remarkably preserved log blockhouse was built in 1793, according to historians. There are several references to Fort Yargo as existing prior to 1800. Its location is given as three miles southwest of “Jug Tavern,” original name for Winder.

Early historians say Fort Yargo was one of four forts built by Humphries Brothers to protect early white settlers from Indians. The other three forts were listed as at Talassee, Thomocoggan, now Jefferson, and Groaning Rock, now Commerce.

Fort Yargo is now a State Park with recreational facilities.
 
Erected 1954 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 007-1.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 33° 58.595′ N, 83° 44.11′ W. Marker is near Winder, Georgia, in Barrow County. Marker is on Broad Street 0.4 miles south of South Broad Street (Georgia Route 81), on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is in Fort Yargo State Park. Broad Street enters the park at the main (northern-most) entrance; the marker is across the bridge, in a parking lot on the left at the blockhouse. There is a fee to enter the park to reach the marker. Marker is in this post office area: Winder GA 30680, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Fort Yargo Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, December 13, 2004
2. Fort Yargo Marker
The marker at its original location on Georgia Highway 81 (on the left) at Carson Wages Road
At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Builder of the Nation (approx. 1.3 miles away); The Stoneman Raid Battle of King's Tanyard (approx. 1.3 miles away); Barrow County (approx. 1.3 miles away); Winder's Most Historical Site (approx. 1.4 miles away); Concord Methodist Cemetery (approx. 1.4 miles away); Glenwood Elementary and High School (approx. 1.7 miles away); Russell House (approx. 1.8 miles away); Bethlehem United Methodist Church (approx. 3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winder.
 
Regarding Fort Yargo. The Fort Yargo blockhouse was moved from its original location off Carson Wages Road east of Georgia Highway 81 to its new location inside the park, where it was restored. The marker, formerly at the intersection of GA 81 and Carson Wages Road, was moved with the blockhouse. The blockhouse and marker were apparently moved in 2005-2006.
 
Categories. Antebellum South, USForts, CastlesNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Fort Yargo Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 11, 2009
3. Fort Yargo Marker
The marker, information board, and the Fort Yargo Blockhouse in their new location
Fort Yargo image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 11, 2009
4. Fort Yargo
Fort Yargo Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 11, 2009
5. Fort Yargo Blockhouse
Fort Yargo Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 11, 2009
6. Fort Yargo Blockhouse
The blockhouse now overlooks a man-made lake in Fort Yargo State Park. (The lake was made by damming Marburg Creek.)
Stone Monument in front of the Fort Yargo Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, September 11, 2009
7. Stone Monument in front of the Fort Yargo Blockhouse
(Top) FORT YARGO LOG BLOCKHOUSE BUILT IN 1793 BY THE STATE OF GEORGIA TO PROTECT WHITE SETTLERS FROM INDIANS (Front) WINDER CHAPTERS S.A.R. - FIRST PRESIDENT COL. J. DALA WATSON D.A.R. - FIRST REGENT MRS. ANNIE I. JACKSON FORTSON THIS MARKER PLACED BY C.O. MADDOX SR. - 1967
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 12, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,758 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on September 12, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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