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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Third Battle of Winchester

 
 
Third Battle of Winchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
1. Third Battle of Winchester Marker
Inscription. Here Confederate forces under General Jubal A. Early, facing east, received the attack of Sheridan’s army at noon on September 19, 1864. Early repulsed the attack and countercharged, breaking the Union line. Only prompt action by General Emory Upton in changing front saved the Union forces from disaster. At 3 P.M. Sheridan made a second attack, driving Early back to Winchester.
 
Erected 1988 by Department of Conservation and Historic Resources. (Marker Number J 3.)
 
Location. 39° 11.285′ N, 78° 6.734′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker is at the intersection of Berryville Pike (Virginia Route 7) and Greewood Road (County Route 656), on the right when traveling east on Berryville Pike. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jost Hite and Winchester ( here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. half a mile away); The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester
Markers at the Intersection of Berryville Pike and Greenwood Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
2. Markers at the Intersection of Berryville Pike and Greenwood Road
( approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. 0.7 miles away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. one mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. one mile away); a different marker also named The Third Battle of Winchester ( approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
Regarding Third Battle of Winchester. This marker replaces a previous J 3 with the same title, but which stood on US 522 further south, at the east entrance to Winchester. The only major difference was the use of the label “Unionists” instead of “Union Forces” in the text.
 
Also see . . .
1. Virtual Tour of the Third Winchester Battlefield. Included is a panorama of the exit of Berryville Canyon. (Submitted on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Third Battle of Winchester or Opequon. From the National Park Service survey of battlefields in the Shenandoah Valley. (Submitted on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Biography of Emory Upton
Berrville Canyon image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 25, 2007
3. Berrville Canyon
Looking west toward Winchester. On the morning of September 19, 1864, Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan marched the bulk of his command up the Berryville Turnpike (now Virginia Route 7) towards Lt. Gen. Jubal Early's Army of the Valley at Winchester. The canyon was a perfect place to bottle up Sheridan's advance, but only a few pickets guarded the western entrance. Still, the Federal advance was slowed as the supporting wagon trains held up the march.
. Upton was one of the rising stars of the Union Army by late 1864. Seen as a tactical visionary, Upton went on to write the definitive tactics manuals for the Army in the post war period. (Submitted on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 4,333 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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