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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Venice in Sarasota County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The Calusa and Seminole Peoples

 
 
The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 9, 2009
1. The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker
Inscription. The Calusa were native Florida Indians who dominated south Florida from their homeland on the southwest Gulf coast. They were formidable warriors, accomplished artists, and expert boaters. The Calusa did not farm, but instead prospered by fishing in the rich estuaries using nets, traps, and weirs, and by gathering shellfish and wild plant foods. They resisted Spanish domination for over two hundred years.

In the early 1700s other Indians from Georgia and Alabama raided into the Florida peninsula, forcing the Calusa from their traditional lands. Creek Indians, loosely allied with the British, and Yamassee Indians bent on enslaving south Florida Indians for sale in the Carolinas, gradually overran south Florida. By 1750, the Calusa had succumbed to diseases, slavery, and warfare.

By that same time Seminole and Miccosukee peoples, Creek-related groups from the north, began to live year-round in northern Florida. In 1823 the treaty of Moultrie Creek gave them perpetual rights to a reservation that extended from Fort King near Ocala south to Lake Okeechobee. But in the 1830s the United States sought to force removal of the Florida Indians to west of the Mississippi River. Resistance to removal led to conflict and the 1836-1842 Second Seminole War. Many of the native peoples were ultimately removed to Oklahoma, but several
The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 9, 2009
2. The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker
hundred people resisted and retreated into the Everglades and Big Cypress Swamp.

In 1855 a band of surveyors operating deep in Big Cypress Swamp intentionally destroyed agricultural fields belonging to Chief Billy Bowlegs, ridiculing his protestations. Conflict again arose, and the Third Seminole War, 1855-1858, followed. Despite a massive effort by the U.S. Army, the Seminole successfully resisted. Just over 120 Seminoles agreed to move to Oklahoma, but many more remained in Florida where their descendants continue to live today.
 
Location. 27° 6.002′ N, 82° 27.43′ W. Marker is in Venice, Florida, in Sarasota County. Marker is at the intersection of Venice Avenue West and Armada Road North, in the median on Venice Avenue West. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Venice FL 34285, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Venice Army Air Base (within shouting distance of this marker); 1926 Article From "Venice News" (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pioneer Court (approx. 0.3 miles away); Welcome to Heritage Court / Fred H. Albee, M.D. (approx. 0.3 miles away); Lord - Higel House Restoration Project
The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 9, 2009
3. The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker
View of historical marker on the median strip of west bound Venice Avenue.
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Venice Apartment District (approx. 0.4 miles away); Venice (approx. 0.6 miles away); Kentucky Military Institute (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Venice.
 
Categories. MilitaryNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 9, 2009
4. The Calusa and Seminole Peoples Marker
View of historical marker on the median strip of west bound Venice Avenue. The Venice Public Beach is just out of view at the end of Venice Avenue.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 30, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 1,457 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 30, 2009, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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