Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Manassas, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Wartime Manassas

“On to Richmond!”

 
 
“On to Richmond!” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
1. “On to Richmond!” Marker
Inscription. (During the Civil War, two railroads—the Manassas Gap and the Orange and Alexandria—intersected here. Manassas Junction was strategically important to both the Union and the Confederacy as a supply depot and for military transportation. Two of the war’s great battles were fought nearby. Diaries, letters, and newspaper articles documented the war’s effects on civilians as well as the thousand of soldiers who passed through the junction.)

On July 16, 1861, Confederate Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard received a coded message here from the famous Confederate spy, Mrs. Rose O’Neal Greenhow, in Washington. She warned him that she had copies of orders for Union Gen. Irving McDowell to march 35,000 troops to capture Manassas and then move on to Richmond. Beauregard wired Confederate President Jefferson Davis to request reinforcements. Davis confirmed McDowell’s advance, then ordered Gen. Joseph E. Johnston’s army from the Shenandoah Valley to Manassas Junction.

Early on July 18, just as Union Gen. Robert Patterson telegraphed Washington that he had “succeeded in keeping General Johnston’s force at Winchester,” Johnston slipped his command out of town. Johnston did not tell his men where they were going, and their forced march did not end until 2 a.m. on July 19, at Paris, Virginia. As the soldiers rested, Johnston
“On to Richmond!” Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, June 10, 2006
2. “On to Richmond!” Marker
rode ahead to Piedmont Station (present-day Delaplane) to arrange for trains to transport them there. When he learned of the fight at Blackburn’s Ford earlier that day, he sent word to Beauregard that he was on his way. About 6 a.m., Johnston’s first brigade, under Gen. Thomas J. Jackson, marched into view and soon boarded railroad cars for the eight-hour ride. The brigade arrived here in time to help defend the junction at the First Battle of Manassas. Within 28 hours, the men had covered 60 miles and made history as the first soldiers ever to move from one theatre of war to another by train.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Manassas Gap Railroad, the Virginia Civil War Trails, and the Virginia, Wartime Manassas Walking Tour marker series.
 
Location. 38° 45.018′ N, 77° 28.399′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of West Street and the railroad tracks, on the right when traveling south on West Street. Touch for map. Marker is across the tracks from the railroad station. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20110, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Wartime Manassas (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas
Close Up of Marker image. Click for full size.
June 10, 2006
3. Close Up of Marker
Captions read Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard; Gen. Joseph E. Johnston; Train carrying Civil War soldiers glad to be riding instead of marching.
(within shouting distance of this marker); Site of Manassas Junction (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 400 feet away); Manassas 1900 (about 500 feet away); Opera House (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Wartime Manassas (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .  Too Few Trains: The Reinforcement of P. G. T. Beauregard at First Manassas. by Charles T. Harrell. (Submitted on August 25, 2006.) 
 
Categories. Railroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Close Up of Marker image. Click for full size.
June 10, 2006
4. Close Up of Marker
Caption reads Rose O'Neal Greenhow and daughter "Little Rose" in Old Capitor Prison —Courtesy Library of Congress
Close Up View of the Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
5. Close Up View of the Map
Jackson's Route to First Manassas
The Marker Across the Railroad Tracks from the Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
6. The Marker Across the Railroad Tracks from the Railroad Station
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 25, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,580 times since then and 50 times this year. Last updated on September 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on August 25, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   3, 4. submitted on November 19, 2006.   5, 6. submitted on September 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement