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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Katonah in Westchester County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Terrace Garden

John Jay Homestead

 
 
The Terrace Garden Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
1. The Terrace Garden Marker
Inscription.
In numerous Jay family photographs, the terrace appears as an active lawn and garden area for family gatherings. The terrace garden was designed in 1924 in conjunction with the addition of the west wing of the house.

The Rusticus Garden Club began to take care of the terrace garden as a community volunteer project in 1969. After the original plans were found in the Homestead archives in 1992, the club undertook the gardenís restoration and continues to maintain it through volunteer efforts and fund-raising activities.
 
Erected by Friends of the Jay Homestead. (Marker Number 11.)
 
Location. 41° 15.089′ N, 73° 39.638′ W. Marker is in Katonah, New York, in Westchester County. Marker can be reached from Jay Street (New York State Route 22) 0.1 miles south of Beaver Dam Road, on the left when traveling south. Touch for map. Located on the grounds of the John Jay Homestead. Marker is at or near this postal address: 400 Route 22, Katonah NY 10536, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Carriage Drive and Roadways (a few steps from this marker); The North Lawn (within shouting distance of this marker); The Schoolhouse and Homestead Lawn
The Original Garden image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
2. The Original Garden
[ detail from the marker ]
Photograph of the original garden blueprint from 1924 and of the garden as it existed in 1925.
(within shouting distance of this marker); The Beech Allee (Avenue) and Stone Fences (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bedford House (about 300 feet away); The Sundial and Fountain Gardens (about 400 feet away); John Jay Homestead (about 500 feet away); Welcome to John Jay Homestead (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Katonah.
 
Categories. AgricultureAnimalsNotable Places
 
The Terrace Garden and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 14, 2009
3. The Terrace Garden and Marker
In front of the arch is the gravestone of William Jay IIís Horse, Old Fred.
Gravestone of William Jay IIís Horse, Old Fred image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
4. Gravestone of William Jay IIís Horse, Old Fred
In Memory
Of
Old Fred
Who Carried
Colonel Jay
Through the Battles Of
Chancellorsville,
Gettysburg,
Peebleís Farm,
& Appomattox.
And Who Died At
Bedford
In May 1883
Aged 28 Years
Aerial View image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
5. Aerial View
[ detail from the marker ]
This aerial photograph, ca. 1960, shows open pasture areas surrounding the Homestead. The once open fields, outlined by stone walls and roadways, have become thickly forested.
Old Fred image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
6. Old Fred
[ detail from the marker ]
Under the rose arbor at the western end of the garden is a stone marker honoring the memory of “Old Fred,” the horse that carried Colonel William Jay II through the major battles of the Civil War and safely home again.
Eleanor Iselin image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
7. Eleanor Iselin
[ detail from the marker ]
Eleanor Iselin on her horse “Blue Ridge” in the garden, ca. 1930.
The Main House from the Terrace Garden image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, November 10, 2009
8. The Main House from the Terrace Garden
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 21, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 723 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on November 21, 2009, by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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