Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Morro Bay in San Luis Obispo County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

The First Landing of Filipinos in the Continental United States

Historic Site

 
 
The First Landing of Filipinos in the Continental United States Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 5, 2008
1. The First Landing of Filipinos in the Continental United States Marker
Inscription. During the Manila-Acapulco Galleon Trade Era from 1565 to 1815 Spanish galleons crossed the Pacific between the Philippines and Mexico.

On October 18, 1587, the Manila Galleon Nuestra Senora de Esperanza commanded by Pedro de Unamuno entered Morro Bay near here. A landing party was sent to shore which included Luzon Indios, marking the first landing of Filipinos in the continental United States. The landing party took official possession of the area for Spain by putting up a cross made of branches. The group was attacked by native Indians two days later, and one of the Filipinos was killed. Unamuno and his crew gave up further exploration of this part of the coast.
Historical Landmark Declared by the
Filipino American National Historical Society
California Central Coast Chapter
Dedicated October 21, 1995

 
Erected 1995 by California Central Coast Chapter of the Filipino American National Historical Society.
 
Location. 35° 22.334′ N, 120° 51.663′ W. Marker is in Morro Bay, California, in San Luis Obispo County. Marker can be reached from Coleman Drive west of Embarcadero. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Morro Bay CA 93442, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
The First Landing of Filipinos in the Continental United States Marker - Wide Shot image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 5, 2008
2. The First Landing of Filipinos in the Continental United States Marker - Wide Shot
This shot of the marker and surroundings, looking east from the marker site, shows the Morro Bay Power Plant in the background. Completed in 1955, the steam electric plant was the first to employee seawater evaporators for the industrial production of fresh water in the US.
At least 8 other markers are within 13 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Morro Rock (approx. mile away); Cayucos by the Sea (approx. 5.9 miles away); Home of Capt. James Cass (approx. 5.9 miles away); Mustang Memorial Plaza (approx. 12.2 miles away); The Old Powerhouse (approx. 12.2 miles away); Faces of Freedom Veterans Memorial (approx. 12.7 miles away); Chong's Candy Store (approx. 12.8 miles away); Site of Ah Louis Store (approx. 12.8 miles away).
 
More about this marker. The marker is mounted on a rock near the picnic tables and tree nearest to Coleman Drive in Coleman Park. The park is located only a few hundred yards from Morro Rock, a landmark visible for miles, and so is easy to find.
 
Also see . . .
1. Early Filipino History in America. A timeline, published by the Filipino American National Historical Society. (Submitted on November 22, 2009.) 

2. Did Pedro de Unamuno Really Land in Morro Bay in 1587? Probably Not!. A discussion of the issue of whether the Nuestra Senora de Esperanza actually landed in Morro Bay or at a different location. (Submitted on November 22, 2009.) 

3. 422 years ago. Rodel Rodis' article on the Nuestra Senora de Buena Esperanza's landing on the central California coast, offering much more historical detail than is
Morro Bay as seen from the marker site image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, September 5, 2008
3. Morro Bay as seen from the marker site
contained on the marker. (Submitted on November 22, 2009.) 
 
Additional keywords. Pinoy
 
Categories. ExplorationNotable EventsWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 22, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,334 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 22, 2009, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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