Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vincennes in Knox County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Old Cathedral “French and Indian” Cemetery

 
 
The Old Cathedral "French and Indian" Cemetery, 1750-1846 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
1. The Old Cathedral "French and Indian" Cemetery, 1750-1846 Marker
Inscription. 1750–1846. Contains the graves (mostly unmarked) of some 4,000 inhabitants of early Vincennes, including soldiers and patriots of the American Revolution who helped Colonel George Rogers Clark to capture nearby Fort Sackville in 1779. The cemetery marks the site of the log church where the people of vincennes swore an oath of allegiance to the Republic of Virginia and the United States on July 20, 1778. During the siege of Fort Sackville (February 23–24, 1779), Clark’s men took up positions at the church and cemetery. It was at the church that Colonel Clark and the British commander, Lieutenant Governor Henry Hamilton, negotiated terms of surrender on February 24. The surrender of Fort Sackville occurred the next day, February 25, 1779. As a result, Hamilton’s plan to crush the Revolution in the West was checked and a basis was laid for the United Sates to later claim the area northwest of the Ohio River from which were eventually formed the states of Indiana, Illinois, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and part of Minnesota.

The Old Cathedral and Cemetery are located in the Vincinnes Historic District, which was placed on the National Register of Historical Places on December 31, 1974.
 
Erected 1998 by Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin Societies of the Sons
The Old Cathedral "French and Indian" Cemetery, 1750-1846 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
2. The Old Cathedral "French and Indian" Cemetery, 1750-1846 Marker
of the American Revolution.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Sons of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 38° 40.781′ N, 87° 31.988′ W. Marker is in Vincennes, Indiana, in Knox County. Marker is at the intersection of South 2nd Street and Church Street on South 2nd Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Vincennes IN 47591, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. U.S.S. Vincennes (a few steps from this marker); Vincennes in the American Revolution (within shouting distance of this marker); Gold Star - - Honor Roll (within shouting distance of this marker); Vincennes (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Patriotism of Charles Gratiot (about 300 feet away); Site of House Occupied as Headquarters (about 300 feet away); Site of Ferry Landing (about 500 feet away); Home of Francis Vigo (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vincennes.
 
Categories. Colonial EraNotable BuildingsNotable EventsNotable PersonsPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & Settlers
 
The Old Cathedral "French and Indian" Cemetery, 1750-1846 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light
3. The Old Cathedral "French and Indian" Cemetery, 1750-1846 Marker
In Memory of Caroline Benedict consort of Daniel Benedict who departed this life May 17th 1845 in the 18th year of her age
Cemetery and Cruicifix image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, August 28, 2007
4. Cemetery and Cruicifix
The Old Cathedral and “French and Indian” Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 15, 2012
5. The Old Cathedral and “French and Indian” Cemetery Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 17, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. This page has been viewed 2,380 times since then and 57 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 17, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.   5. submitted on December 13, 2012, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement