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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Mitchell in Russell County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

John Crowell

 
 
John Crowell Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
1. John Crowell Marker
Inscription.
Near here is the site where John Crowell lived, died, and is interred. Colonel Crowell was born in Halifax County, North Carolina, on September 18, 1780; moved to Alabama in 1815, having been appointed as Agent of the United States to the Muscogee Indians. In 1817, he was elected as Alabama's first and only Territorial Delegate to the 15th Congress, where he served from January 29, 1818, until March 3, 1819. Upon Alabama's admission as a State, he was elected its first Congressman.

Reverse:
Served in the 16th Congress from December 14, 1819, until March 3, 1821; then appointed Agent for the Creek Indian Confederacy, which encompassed West Georgia and East Alabama, until the Indians were moved West in 1836. Thereafter, he was nationally known for his race horses, one of which "John Bascomb" was walked from here to Long Island, New York, where on May 5, 1836, on Union Course, he won the prestigious "South Against the North Race". Colonel Crowell died June 25, 1846, and is interred on his plantation.
 
Erected 1984 by The Historic Chattahoochee Commission / The Russell County Historical Commission.
 
Location. Marker has been reported missing. It was located near 32° 20.82′ N, 85° 1.146′ 
John Crowell Marker Reverse image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
2. John Crowell Marker Reverse
W. Marker was in Fort Mitchell, Alabama, in Russell County. Marker could be reached from U.S. 165. Touch for map. This marker is located on the grounds of the Fort Mitchell Historic Landmark Park, about half-mile from the main entrance on the road to the site of the fort on the left in front of the Cantey Cemetery. Marker was at or near this postal address: 561 Highway 165, Fort Mitchell AL 36856, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Asbury School and Mission (here, next to this marker); James Cantey (here, next to this marker); Fort Mitchell Military Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Mitchell (about 600 feet away); United States Indian Trading Post (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Fort Mitchell (about 600 feet away); Address by President Lincoln (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Creeks Today (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Mitchell.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansPoliticsSettlements & Settlers
 
Cantey Cemetery entrance and the John Crowell Marker (on the left) image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
3. Cantey Cemetery entrance and the John Crowell Marker (on the left)
John Crowell Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, June 30, 2018
4. John Crowell Marker
The John Crowell Marker was previously to the far left of this group of markers and is currently missing or was removed.
Cantey Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
5. Cantey Cemetery
John Crowell Memorial Obelisk image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, December 28, 2009
6. John Crowell Memorial Obelisk
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 13, 2018. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 2,550 times since then and 64 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   4. submitted on July 10, 2018, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   5, 6. submitted on January 1, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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