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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Fort Davis in Jeff Davis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Fort Davis

 
 
Fort Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, December 22, 2009
1. Fort Davis Marker
Inscription. Established by Lieut. Col. Washington Seawell with six companies of the Eighth U.S. Infantry in October 1854 for protecting travelers on the San Antonio-El Paso Road. Named in honor of the then Secretary of War, Jefferson Davis, it was abandoned by federal troops in April 1861, reoccupied in 1867. Troops from the post helped to bring about the peaceful settlement and development of the region. Fort Davis was deactivated in 1891.
 
Erected 1936 by State of Texas. (Marker Number 478.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Antonio de Espejo Entrada of 1582-1583, the San Antonio-El Paso Road, and the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 30° 35.815′ N, 103° 53.506′ W. Marker is near Fort Davis, Texas, in Jeff Davis County. Marker can be reached from Cavalry Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Davis TX 79734, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The First Fort Davis (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); San Antonio-El Paso Road (approx. 0.2 miles away); St. Joseph Catholic Church (approx. mile away); Hotel Limpia (approx. 0.6 miles away);
Panorama of Fort Davis image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney
2. Panorama of Fort Davis
Marker is near front of parking lot, by small foot bridge over the dry arroyo, right of picture.
Union Mercantile (approx. 0.6 miles away); T/SGT. Manuel S. Gonzales (approx. 0.6 miles away); Old Fort Davis CSA (approx. 0.6 miles away); Jeff Davis County Courthouse (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Davis.
 
More about this marker. Marker is located near the parking lot of the Fort Davis National Historic Site.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Davis, National Park Service website. (Submitted on January 15, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
2. Fort Stockton, Site of Comanche Springs. Fort Stockton was another fort on the historic San Antonio - El Paso road, as well as a key watering hole on the Comanche Trail to and from Mexico. (Submitted on January 15, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

3. San Antonio - El Paso Road, Wikipedia article. (Submitted on January 15, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.)
4. Painted Comanche Camp, Texas Beyond History webpage. U.S. Army engineers who passed through here in 1849 named their resting place (just north of what would become Fort Davis) "Painted Comanche Camp," so named because of pictographs
Historic San Antonio - El Paso road ran through Fort Davis image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, December 22, 2009
3. Historic San Antonio - El Paso road ran through Fort Davis
If you are interested in an aerial view of the remnants of this road as it passed through the fort, this sign is located at lat/long: 30.596067,-103.890828 The road remnants are visible running roughly north-south through the fort (the sign is north-south oriented). Going north the road would eventually have veered east to Fort Stockton en route to San Antonio, TX; Or going south it would eventually veer west on to El Paso, TX.
that adorned nearby cottonwood trees. (Submitted on September 24, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 

5. Antonio de Espejo, link to article on Texas Escapes website. Antonio de Espejo was a Spanish explorer who led an expedition into New Mexico, Arizona and Texas in 1582-1583. Guided by Jumano Indians he was the first Spanish explorer to visit the site that would later become Fort Davis, traveling on a trail through the Davis Mountains that would become part of the San Antonio - El Paso road. (Submitted on October 1, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. 1936 Centennial Highway Marker
This is a 1936 Centennial highway marker. The pink granite base is part of the original marker, but the original bronze inscription tablet was replaced by the existing tablet.
    — Submitted August 20, 2017, by Duane Hall of Abilene, Texas.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesRoads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
Fort Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 12, 2012
4. Fort Davis Marker
Photo of interpretive display at Fort Davis showing an artist's rendition of what is known as Painted Comanche Camp, just north of the Ft. Davis State Park.
San Antonio - El Paso Road and Painted Comanche Camp in distance image. Click for full size.
By Richard Denney, September 12, 2012
5. San Antonio - El Paso Road and Painted Comanche Camp in distance
View of the San Antonio - El Paso Road leading north out of the Ft. Davis State Park. Cottonwood trees in distance at base of mountain mark general local of Painted Comanche Camp on Limpia Creek. The road just outside the park reflects this history and is named "Painted Trees Road".
Fort Davis Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
6. Fort Davis Marker
Fort Davis Marker is on the left. National Historic Landmark plaque is on the right.
Fort Davis Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
7. Fort Davis Entrance
Fort Davis Officers Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
8. Fort Davis Officers Quarters
Fort Davis Enlisted Men's Barracks image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, October 24, 2012
9. Fort Davis Enlisted Men's Barracks
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 20, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 11, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas. This page has been viewed 1,029 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on January 15, 2010, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   4, 5. submitted on September 24, 2012, by Richard Denney of Austin, Texas.   6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on November 19, 2012, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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