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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Winchester, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Winchester

The Valley Campaigns

 

—1862 & 1864 Valley Campaigns —

 
Winchester Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
1. Winchester Marker
Inscription. Winchester’s location at the north end of the Shenandoah Valley made it a place of strategic importance during the Civil War.

From here, roads led north and east threatening Washington, D.C., and the Valley Turnpike led south and west endangering the breadbasket of the Confederacy.

Winchester endured a seemingly endless series of occupations and evacuations as the war ebbed and flowed through the city.

Stonewall Jackson made his headquarters here during the winter of 1861–1862. He fought the Valley’s first major battle at Kernstown, just south of the city on March 23, 1862. The bloody clashes continued through the years until Union Gen. Philip Sheridan’s army drove Confederate Gen. Jubal Early’s troops out of Winchester for the last time September 19, 1864.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 11.022′ N, 78° 9.837′ W. Marker is in Winchester, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of North Cameron Street (Business U.S. 522) and East Boscawen Street, on the right when traveling north on North Cameron Street. Touch for map. Located on the Boscawen Street side of the
Marker on the side of the Kurtz Cultural Center image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
2. Marker on the side of the Kurtz Cultural Center
Kurtz Cultural Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2 North Cameron Street, Winchester VA 22601, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 10 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rouss City Hall Historical Tour (within shouting distance of this marker); Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd (within shouting distance of this marker); Second Battle of Winchester (within shouting distance of this marker); Jacob H. Yost Building (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); George Washington's Political Career Began on this Site (about 400 feet away); Lord Fairfax (about 400 feet away); Taylor Hotel (about 400 feet away); Colonel James Wood (about 400 feet away); Frederick County Courthouse (about 500 feet away); A View of Winchester in 1745 - The Four Public Lots (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. On the right side of the marker is a collection of drawings and photographs. The larger is a drawing showing action in Winchester’s streets, captioned, “1862–Jackson’s Valley Campaign A 19th century engraving depicts an ‘Adventure of Ashby at Winchester,’ involving Stonewall Jackson’s cavalry commander, Turner Ashby. Jackson suffered the only loss of his 1862 campaign just south
Kurtz Cultural Center / Chamber of Commerce image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 26, 2007
3. Kurtz Cultural Center / Chamber of Commerce
The building dates to the early 1800s.
of here at Kernstown, but the boldness of his attack drew Union troops from the campaign against Richmond.”

A photograph on the upper right is from “1863–Lee’s Gettysburg Campaign.” Showing captured artillery it is captioned, “As Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee began his 1863 ‘invasion of the North,’ Union forces, fortified near here, were cleared from his army’s path to prevent harassment from the rear. Union forces stationed at Fort Milroy (shown here), Fort Collier, West Fort and Star Fort were defeated during Lee’s march north.”

On the lower left is a photo taken during “1864–Sheridan’s Valley Campaign.” Showing a battle site from the Third Winchester where “The 2nd Virginia Cavalry, US (West Virginia) encamped at Hackwood on the Third Winchester battlefield, just north of the city.”
 
Also see . . .  Winchester Battlefields. From Shenandoah at War. (Submitted on September 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords. 1862 Valley Campaign, 1864 Valley Campaign
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
1862 Jackson's Valley Campaign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 18, 2015
4. 1862 Jackson's Valley Campaign
A 19th century engraving depicts an “Adventure of Ashby at Winchester,” involving Stonewall Jackson's cavalry commander, Turner Ashby. Jackson suffered the only loss of his 1862 campaign just south of here at Kernstown, but the boldness of his attack drew Union troops from the campaign against Richmond.
Close-up of image on marker
1863 - Lee's Gettysburg Campaign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 18, 2015
5. 1863 - Lee's Gettysburg Campaign
As Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee began his 1863 “invasion of the North,” Union forces, fortified near here, were cleared from his army's path to prevent harassment from the rear. Union forces stationed at Fort Milroy (shown here), Fort Collier, West Fort and Star Fort were defeated during Lee's march north.
Close-up of image on marker
1864 -Sheridan's Valley Campaign image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 18, 2015
6. 1864 -Sheridan's Valley Campaign
The 2nd Virginia Cavalry U.S. (West Virginia) encampled at Hackwood on the Third Winchester battlefield, just north of the city.
Close-up of image on marker
Washington Square image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, October 18, 2015
7. Washington Square
2 North Cameron Street
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,587 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 23, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on October 31, 2015, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page.
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