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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Tampa in Hillsborough County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

U.S.S. Sagamore

 
 
U.S.S. Sagamore Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. U.S.S. Sagamore Marker
"U.S.S. Sagamore marker - Most people are unaware that several small Civil War skirmishes were fought in the vicinity of Tampa. On July 2, 1862, the Confederate commander of Fort Brooke, John W. Pearson, wrote an account of the U.S.S. Sagamore's attempt to reoccupy Tampa. During that engagement, one of the Sagamore's shells landed in Oaklawn Cemetery, which is significantly north of Fort Brooke's position. It is possible that the shell which landed in the cemetery was fired at the rear guard Pearson placed with his ammunition and materiel." (Historic Guides and the Tampa Historical Society)
Inscription.
During the Civil War,
the USS Sagamore on
June 30 - July 1, 1862
bombarded Tampa. An
8 inch shell landed
in the cemetery.

 
Location. 27° 57.243′ N, 82° 27.437′ W. Marker is in Tampa, Florida, in Hillsborough County. Marker is on East Harrison Street near North Morgan Street, on the left. Touch for map. Located at the Oaklawn Cemetery, East Harrison Street entrance, just inside the gate. Marker is in this post office area: Tampa FL 33602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate States Soldiers and Sailors (within shouting distance of this marker); Victims of the Yellow Fever (within shouting distance of this marker); 29 Sea Captains and Mariners (within shouting distance of this marker); Tampa Native Americans (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Brooke Mass Grave (within shouting distance of this marker); Kennedy (within shouting distance of this marker); Oaklawn Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Harlem Academy/School #2 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Tampa.
 
Also see . . .  More on the Sesquicentennial. Photo gallery
U.S.S. Sagamore Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, January 9, 2010
2. U.S.S. Sagamore Marker
(Submitted on July 2, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Additional comments.
1.
The Sagamore carried only one 11" smoothbore (Dahlgren), 2 24 lb. smoothbores and 2 20lb. Parrot Rifles, therefore the exploding type ball that rolled into Oaklawn Cemetery was close to 11", not 8", and of course it did not explode as a blacksmith recovered it and emptied it of its valuable black powder. Our organization, The Tampa 1st US Volunteer Cavalry "Rough Rider" Regiment has, incidentally, recovered this cannon ball from the folks that had kept it all these years. Note To Editor only visible by Contributor and editor    
    — Submitted August 11, 2016, by Brigadier General Carlo Charles Spicola jr of Tampa, Florida 33605.

 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
U.S.S. Sagamore Marker, as seen from the East Harrison Street gate image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 30, 2012
3. U.S.S. Sagamore Marker, as seen from the East Harrison Street gate
U.S.S. Sagamore Marker, 150 year Observance of the Sagamore shelling (Battle of Tampa) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, June 30, 2012
4. U.S.S. Sagamore Marker, 150 year Observance of the Sagamore shelling (Battle of Tampa)
Marker seen at left
150 year Observance Ceremony of U.S.S. Sagamore shelling image. Click for more information.
By Mike Stroud, June 30, 2012
5. 150 year Observance Ceremony of U.S.S. Sagamore shelling
Ceremony includes Miss Rachael Bruce singing the National Anthem, Florida State Song and Dixie
Also included was the reading of the Battle Report of Captain James Pearson (CSA), Ft. Brooke Post Commander, from official records and Tribute to Capt. James Gettis, Co. B, 7th Florida Infantry, prominent Tampa Citizen...and more
Click for more information.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on January 27, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 2,007 times since then and 214 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 27, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4, 5. submitted on July 2, 2012, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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