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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Columbus in Franklin County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Asians in the American Civil War

 
 
Asians in the American Civil War Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 31, 2008
1. Asians in the American Civil War Marker (Side A)
Inscription. Side A:
Despite exclusionary laws preventing U.S. citizenship, Asians served in the Union and Confederate armies and navies during the American Civil War (1861-1865). Many of these soldiers were denied citizenship following their services due to the anti-Asian sentiment, which culminated in the Naturalization Act of 1870 and the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882. The exclusionary laws continued until 1943, and all restrictions on national origin or race were abolished in 1965. In April 2003, House Joint Resolution 45 was introduced to Congress to posthumously proclaim Civil War soldiers of Asian descent to be honorary citizens of the United States as recognition of their honorable services.
(Continued on other side)

Side B:
The official roster of Civil War soldiers of the State of Ohio contains soldiers with Chinese surnames. Records of Asian soldiers are incomplete and difficult to find because many were denied pensions. Some adopted European names, non-Chinese names, or nicknames as their family names. Nonetheless, many Civil War soldiers of Asian descent have been identified and some have been confirmed in literature. Since the Civil War, Asian descendants have served our nation with loyalty in many wars, despite generations of exclusion and discrimination.
 
Erected
Asians in the American Civil War Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 31, 2008
2. Asians in the American Civil War Marker (Side B)
2003 by Organization of Chinese Americans and The Ohio Historical Society. (Marker Number 76-25.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Ohio Historical Society / The Ohio History Connection marker series.
 
Location. 39° 57.971′ N, 82° 57.378′ W. Marker is in Columbus, Ohio, in Franklin County. Marker can be reached from East Broad Street (U.S. 40/62), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in Franklin Park, 1777 E. Broad Street, about 700 feet west of the conservatory. Marker is in this post office area: Columbus OH 43203, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within one mile of this marker, measured as the crow flies. War! – “It Is All Hell” (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); White Oak (about 700 feet away); Mount Vernon Community School (approx. mile away); Formerly Maryland Park (approx. 0.8 miles away); Mount Vernon Avenue (approx. one mile away); Camp Bushnell (approx. one mile away); Bexley (approx. one mile away); Bexley World War II Memorial (approx. one mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Columbus.
 
Also see . . .  Asian Pacific Americans in the United States Army. This official U.S. Army website notes the exploits of two 19th century
Asians in the American Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 31, 2008
3. Asians in the American Civil War Marker
Chinese American immigrants who served in the Union Army. (Submitted on April 22, 2010, by Jordan Yee AKA "Ranger Yee" of Fremont, California.) 
 
Categories. Asian AmericansCivil RightsWar, US Civil
 
Chinese Characters on the Asians in the American Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., December 31, 2008
4. Chinese Characters on the Asians in the American Civil War Marker
This is the symbol for the Organization of Chinese Americans.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 10, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 2,623 times since then and 68 times this year. Last updated on January 27, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on March 10, 2009, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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