Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
New Orleans in Orleans Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

United States Customhouse

 
 
United States Customhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 15, 2009
1. United States Customhouse Marker
Inscription.
United States Customhouse
Has been designated a
National
Historic Landmark

This site possesses national significance
in commemorating the
history of the
United States of America

 
Erected 1974 by National Park Service - United States Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 29° 57.102′ N, 90° 3.989′ W. Marker is in New Orleans, Louisiana, in Orleans Parish. Marker is at the intersection of Canal Street and Decatur/Magazine Street, on the right when traveling west on Canal Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 423 Canal Street, New Orleans LA 70130, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Canal Street Historic District (within shouting distance of this marker); 114 Magazine Street (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Bank’s Arcade (about 800 feet away); U.S. Branch Bank (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Birthplace of “Dixie” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bank of Louisiana in New Orleans (approx. 0.2 miles away); Conway’s Court (approx. 0.2 miles away); Edgar Degas House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Orleans.
 
Also see . . .
United States Customhouse, New Orleans, Louisiana image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2009
2. United States Customhouse, New Orleans, Louisiana
Marker is visible on the Canal Street wall, at the corner, lower left.

1. U.S. Customs House, New Orleans. (Submitted on February 16, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. "Old Pete" at Liberty Place [September 14, 1874]. ...Old Pete's militia and metropolitan police under A.S. Badger, were outnumbered more than two to one. At the ripe age of fifty-three, [Gen. James] Longstreet found himself in the midst of the worst street fight in U.S. history. The two sides, Republicans vs. Democrats, exchanged volleys and a fifteen-minute battle ensured. When the smoke cleared, more than 100 people lay dead or wounded. Longstreet's forces were not up to the task and, despite superior weaponry, they broke ranks and were routed. Most fled into the streets of the Latin Quarter. Longstreet suffered the humiliation of being wounded by a spent bullet and was captured by the mob. [Gov. William P.] Kellogg remained in hiding on U.S. property at the Customs House. Within days, Federal gunboats and fresh troops arrived and restored order to "The Big Easy." But, as history demonstrated, the aftermath was anything but easy. (Submitted on February 24, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Additional keywords. "Old Post Office"; Reconstruction; Battle of Liberty Place; Customs House; James Longstreet, Surveyor
<i>Custom House, New Orleans, La.</i> image. Click for full size.
Postcard by the Lipsher Specialty Co., circa 1910
3. Custom House, New Orleans, La.
The back of the card reads:The Custom House is a large granite building, occupying an entire Square of ground on Canal St. between N. Peters and Decatur streets. The Cornerstone was laid in 1847 by Henry Clay. The Architecture is modified egyptian, and the cost of building was over Four Million Dollars.
of Customs at New Orleans

 
Categories. Antebellum South, USGovernmentPolitics
 
You are Standing in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 27, 2011
4. You are Standing in History Marker
You are in the carriageway of the U.S. Custom House. In the 1780s, the Spanish Custom House stood here. Two American Custom Houses followed, but were outgrown as port of trade exploded after the Louisiana Purchase. Construction of this building began in 1843, halted during the Civil War, and finished in 1881. Then (as now) the Customs House processed trade documents, cleared vessels for entry, and collected duties (taxes) on goods imported via ships. In early New Orleans, the “imports” included scores of immigrants – plus yellow fever-carrying mosquitoes and other unwelcome stowaways. Today, all ports are vigilant in preventing foreign insect pest from coming ashore.
[Illustration captions: left] A stone cutter shapes a massive granite chunk into a finished block for an exterior wall; [center] View from the Custom House root shows the busy port before the war; [right] Under Union occupation, Confederate soldiers were imprisoned in the New Orleans Custom House.
Editor's Note: This marker is inside the Custom House.
You are Standing in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Barry Swackhamer, December 27, 2011
5. You are Standing in History Marker
The carriageway is now enclosed inside the Custom House. Access to the "You are Standing in History" marker is gained by entering the Audubon Insectarium. The marker is near the cafeteria.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 18, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 16, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,300 times since then and 125 times this year. Last updated on March 2, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on February 16, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on February 24, 2015.   4, 5. submitted on January 13, 2012, by Barry Swackhamer of San Jose, California. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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