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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

City Hall

Former Frederick County Courthouse

 

—Antietam Campaign 1862 —

 
City Hall Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. City Hall Marker
Inscription. Connections with the Civil War abound around this Courthouse Square, where the first official act of defiance against the British crown - the 1765 Stamp Act Repudiation - occurred almost a century earlier. In 1857, Roger Brooke Taney, Chief Justice of the US Supreme Court and a former resident who is buried in Frederick, wrote in the Dread Scott Decision that the Constitution's freedoms did not extend to African-Americans, one of the steps on the road to war. Taney and his brother-in-law, Francis Scott Key, both practiced law here. A bust here honors the Chief Justice who administered the Oath of Office to seven presidents, including Abraham Lincoln in 1861.

Governor Thomas Hicks called a special session of the Maryland Legislature in 1861 to address the question of secession. Because of the large number of US troops in the capital city of Annapolis, the legislature met here at the site of the former Frederick County courthouse. Finding the space inadequate, the lawmakers convened a block away in Kemp Hall. Under orders from President Lincoln, legislators likely to favor the South were detained in route. With no quorum, Maryland's legislature could not vote to secede. The courthouse burned during the session, and the legislature promptly authorized financing to construct the present building, now City Hall.

Both Confederate
Map of Nearby Civil War Related Points of Interest image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Map of Nearby Civil War Related Points of Interest
Of the sites noted:

A. Kemp Hall - See Link Number 1 below
B. Old City Hall - See Link Number 2 below
C. Trinity Chapel - Pictured below
D. Evangelical Reformed Church - See Link Number 3 below
E. Taney Bust - See Link Number 4 below
F. All Saints Episcopal Church - Pictured below
G. City Hall - Pictured below
H. Ramsey House - See Link Number 5 below
Gen. Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson and President Lincoln were visitors to this neighborhood in 1862.

The reconstructed home of Barbara Fritchie, poet John Greenleaf Whittier's Civil War heroine, is reached by traveling one block south on Court Street, then one block west on Patrick Street.
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 24.958′ N, 77° 24.754′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Counsil Street, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Located on the north side of the Frederick City Hall. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. No to the Stamp! (here, next to this marker); The Ross Home (a few steps from this marker); The Dred Scott Decision (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); Thomas Johnson (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); Birthplace of William Tyler Page (within shouting distance
Marker on the North Side of the City Hall Courtyard image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
3. Marker on the North Side of the City Hall Courtyard
of this marker); Unanimous Resolution (within shouting distance of this marker); “South Magnetic” (within shouting distance of this marker); Frederick’s Poet Lawyer (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a drawing of Lincoln's Oath of Office administered by Chief Justice Taney. The upper center contains a drawing of The second Frederick County Courthouse, built in 1785, burned in May 1861. And a map of the City Hall and vicinity points out sites associated with the history of Frederick as related to the Civil War.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kemp Hall Marker. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Old City Hall - North Market Street Marker. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
3. Evangelical Reformed Church Marker. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
4. Taney Bust. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
5. Ramsey House. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
6. All Saints Episcopal Church
Trinity Chapel image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
4. Trinity Chapel
One of the many spires which highlight the profile of Frederick.
. (Submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Additional keywords. Antietam Campaign
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
The Second Frederick Court House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 23, 2015
5. The Second Frederick Court House
built in 1785, burned May 1861.
Close-up of image on marker
Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney and Abraham Lincoln image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
6. Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney and Abraham Lincoln
This reproduction of Henry Roben's oil painting of Taney swearing Lincoln in appeared on the cover of Valley's of History, Vol. 2, No. 1, 1966, accompanying Judge Delaplaine's article on Taney.

“Shown in the picture from left are William H. Seward, Secretary of State; John C. Breckinridge, retiring Vice President; Taney; Edward D. Baker, who introduced Lincoln to the inaugural crowd; William T. Carroll, clerk of the U. S. Supreme Court (holding the bible); James Buchanan, retiring President; Lincoln; Salmon P. Chase, Secretary of the Treasury; Stephen A. Douglas, one of Lincoln's opponents for the Presidency; and Horace Greeley.” — Valley's of History,
All Saints Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
7. All Saints Episcopal Church
Confederate General William Pendleton, who served as an artillerist in the Army of Northern Virginia, was the rector here.
Frederick City Hall - Old County Court House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
8. Frederick City Hall - Old County Court House
Flanking the fountain are busts of Chief Justice Roger B. Taney and Thomas Johnson, Maryland's First Governor.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,528 times since then and 101 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5, 6. submitted on June 22, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   7, 8. submitted on October 7, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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