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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Penn Quarter in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

National Council of Negro Women

633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.

 

—African American Heritage Trail, Washington, DC —

 
National Council of Negro Women Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2008
1. National Council of Negro Women Marker
Inscription. The National Council of Negro Women was founded in 1935 by Mary McLeod Bethune (1875-1955) to "harness the power and extend the leadership of African American women." Early on, the Council campaigned to outlaw the discriminatory poll tax, develop a public health program, adopt anti-lynching legislation, and end discrimination in the U.S. Armed Forces, defense industries and government housing. The Council's 1995 move to this grand, former hotel building made it the only African American organization owning property on historic Pennsylvania Avenue between the Capitol and the White House. The Council created the National Black Family Reunion Celebration in 1986.

Caption under photo: Mary McLeod Bethune, right, with Dorothy Height who became the organization's director in 1957.
 
Erected by Cultural Tourism DC and the DC Historic Preservation Office.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Washington, DC African American Heritage Trail marker series.
 
Location. 38° 53.601′ N, 77° 1.288′ W. Marker is in Penn Quarter, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Pennsylvania Avenue, NW just east of 7th Street, NW. Touch for map. Marker is at
633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 3, 2006
2. 633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW
Former hotel building, erected during the Civil War, now the headquarters of the NCNW. The marker is located on the wall near the entrance, lower right.
or near this postal address: 633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20004, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Grand Army of the Republic (within shouting distance of this marker); National Intelligencer (within shouting distance of this marker); Market Space: Yesterday’s Town Square (within shouting distance of this marker); General Winfield Scott Hancock (within shouting distance of this marker); Ceremony at the Crossroads (within shouting distance of this marker); 601 Pennsylvania Avenue (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); America's Main Street (about 400 feet away); Protecting Consumers and Competition (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Penn Quarter.
 
Also see . . .  National Council of Negro Women. (Submitted on July 20, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. 633 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW.
Designed by the prominent Washington architect Alfred Mullet as a hotel and erected during the Civil War, the building, now headquarters for the National Council of Negro Women (the NCNW), subsequently housed a bank, various offices and stores. In the 1980s, it was renovated as part of the rejuvenation of
"Indiana Plaza" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, July 13, 2008
3. "Indiana Plaza"
View looking northeast from corner of 7th and Pennsylvania, NW. The Benjamin F. Stephenson/Grand Army of the Republic Memorial is visible in the center of the photo, and the NCNW building is behind the trees to the right.
the north side of Pennsylvania Avenue by the Pennsylvania Avenue Redevelopment Corporation. Extracted from the "Civil War to Civil Rights," Downtown Heritage Trail Marker No. 2 - 7th Street at Pennsylvania and Indiana Avenues, NW.
    — Submitted July 20, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.

 
Categories. African AmericansCivil RightsNotable BuildingsNotable PersonsWomen
 
Pennsylvania Avenue: View across 7th Street toward the Capitol, late 19th Century image. Click for full size.
4. Pennsylvania Avenue: View across 7th Street toward the Capitol, late 19th Century
The NCNW headquarters building is seen, center right.
Mary McCloud Bethune and Dorothy Height image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
5. Mary McCloud Bethune and Dorothy Height
Mary McLeod Bethune, right, with Dorothy Height who became the organization's director in 1957.
Close-up of photo on marker
The Apex Building, 633 Pennsylvania Avenue image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 18, 2014
6. The Apex Building, 633 Pennsylvania Avenue
The Library of Congress says this of the Apex Building at 833 Pennsylvania Ave: "Noted photographer Mathew Brady had his studio here in the mid-1800s. Sears Roebuck and Company purchased the building in the 1980s, and it is now the headquarters for the National Council of Negro Women."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on July 20, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,650 times since then and 97 times this year. Last updated on April 24, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 20, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5, 6. submitted on January 19, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
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