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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Kinston in Lenoir County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Foster's Raid

 
 
Foster's Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
1. Foster's Raid Marker
Inscription. On a raid from New Bern to Goldsboro, the Union troops led by Gen. J.G. Foster passed through Kinston, Dec. 14, 1862.
 
Erected 1934 by Division of Archives and History. (Marker Number F 20.)
 
Location. 35° 14.678′ N, 77° 35.041′ W. Marker is in Kinston, North Carolina, in Lenoir County. Marker is at the intersection of South Queen Street (U.S. 258) and East New Bern Road (U.S. 70), on the right when traveling north on South Queen Street. Touch for map. Located on the exit off East New Bern Road (US 70) onto Queen Street (US 258) leading across the Neuse River into Kinston. Marker is in this post office area: Kinston NC 28504, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. North Carolina (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Battle of Kinston (about 300 feet away); Lenoir County Confederate Memorial (about 300 feet away); First Battle of Kinston (approx. 0.3 miles away); Kinston Battlefield Park (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Night of December 13, 1862 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Fighting at Harriet's Chapel (approx. 0.3 miles away); The Site of Harriet's Chapel (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kinston.
 
Also see . . .
Foster's Raid Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
2. Foster's Raid Marker
 First Battle of Kinston. Page detailing the battle and efforts to preserve portions of the battlefield. (Submitted on May 9, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Confederate Line image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 2, 2010
3. Confederate Line
Looking past the marker location at the intersection of US 70 and 258 near the county visitor center. After pressed back from a line along Southwest Creek, the Confederates fell back to a position along the Dover Road (Modern US 70). Facing strong Federal attacks, the Confederates withdrew again across the Neuse using Jones Bridge.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 9, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 737 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on May 9, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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