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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Moundville in Hale County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Moundville

 
 
Moundville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
1. Moundville Marker
Inscription. Site of a prehistoric Native American political and ceremonial center from about A. D. 1100-1500 that, at its height in the 13th century, was America’s largest community north of Mexico. Between 1,000 and 3,000 people lived in this town fortified by a one-mile long wooden wall studded with guard towers. Moundville served as the capital of a powerful chiefdom of about 10,000 people living in smaller villages over a 60-mile stretch of the Black Warrior River Valley from present day Tuscaloosa to Demopolis. The Moundville people constructed 28 massive flat - topped earthen mounds arranged systematically around a vast central plaza. The mounds served as elevated platforms for civic and ceremonial structures and the homes of nobles.
The site was designated a National Historic Landmark in 1964 and added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1966.
 
Erected by Alabama Historical Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 33° 0.181′ N, 87° 37.135′ W. Marker is in Moundville, Alabama, in Hale County. Marker is at the intersection of Mound Parkway and State Highway 69, on the right when traveling west on Mound Parkway
Moundville Marker by the entrance to the Moundville Archaeological Park image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
2. Moundville Marker by the entrance to the Moundville Archaeological Park
. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Moundville AL 35474, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 15 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Stillman College (approx. 13.8 miles away); Brown Memorial Presbyterian Church (approx. 13.8 miles away); Historic Site (approx. 14 miles away); The Jemison Home (approx. 14.1 miles away); Chabannes - Sealy House (approx. 14.1 miles away); Greenwood Cemetery (approx. 14.2 miles away); Bell UH-1 Iroquois (Huey) (approx. 14.2 miles away); M60A3 TTS Medium Tank (approx. 14.2 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Moundville Archaeological Park. (Submitted on May 14, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesNative AmericansNotable PlacesSettlements & Settlers
 
Moundville Archaeological Park Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
3. Moundville Archaeological Park Entrance
Layout map of the mounds at Moundville image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
4. Layout map of the mounds at Moundville
Mound A and the Plaza image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 6, 2007
5. Mound A and the Plaza
Mound B in the distance with replica of a hut. Mound B is the highest mound in the park image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 6, 2007
6. Mound B in the distance with replica of a hut. Mound B is the highest mound in the park
Looking east arcoss the plaza. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
7. Looking east arcoss the plaza.
The pond in the foreground was one of the pits that was originally dug out for the dirt to build the mounds.
The Black Warrior River at Moundville image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 6, 2007
8. The Black Warrior River at Moundville
The Jones Archaeological Museum built by the WPA in 1939 image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
9. The Jones Archaeological Museum built by the WPA in 1939
One of the exhibits in the Jones Archaeological Museum image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, May 13, 2010
10. One of the exhibits in the Jones Archaeological Museum
The Rattlesnake disk is one of many artifacts discovered at Moundville. image. Click for full size.
By Tim Carr, July 6, 2007
11. The Rattlesnake disk is one of many artifacts discovered at Moundville.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 14, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,333 times since then and 91 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on May 14, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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