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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fayetteville in Cumberland County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Parade Ground

Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry

 
 
FILI Parade Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 28, 2010
1. FILI Parade Ground Marker
Inscription.
The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry is North Carolina's oldest military unit and the second-oldest militia organization in the U.S.

At the start of the Civil War, after North Carolina seceded, the company enrolled in active service for six months on April 17, 1861, as Company H, 1st North Carolina Infantry. It seized the U.S. arsenal here and occupied it until the Confederate government took control. In May, the company departed for the camp of instruction in Raleigh. The ladies of Fayetteville untrimmed their hats to trim those of the soldiers with black plumes, so the “officers and men of the Independents strutted like gamecocks, with elaborate plumes on their broad brimmed hats.” The company took part in the first major land engagement of the war at Big Bethel, Virginia, on June 10. When the six-month enlistment ended, the group returned to Fayetteville.

On February 22, 1862, the Independents were reorganized, and many members received commissions or appointments in other units. Others joined the Clarendon Guards for duty at Fort Fisher, leaving a home guard here of men too young or too old to fight. Today the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry, which remained in active service through World War I, is North Carolina's official historic military command and still musters on the parade ground.

Lt.
FILI Parade Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 28, 2010
2. FILI Parade Ground Marker
Looking SW into the Parade Ground, part of the Linear Park.
Benjamin R. Huske took part in the Battle of Big Bethel. Two days later, he wrote his wife that he was “at the main [artillery] battery and had a fine view of the entire fight. ...Gracious how the balls did shower around us and 3 struck the piece we were next to. You can't form any idea of how they hissed and struck, just like a shower of hot stones falling into the water. ...Well you will ask how did you feel just as cool as could be - by no means comfortable but with a determination to do my whole duty whatever the consequence.”

[Yellow box text] On August 23, 1793, the Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Company was organized here as the local militia. Members mustered and drilled on this parade ground, where company fifer Isaac Hammond, an African American who had served in the American Revolution, is also buried. When the Marquis de Lafayette visited Fayetteville in 1825, the Independents escorted him.
 
Erected by North Carolina Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the North Carolina Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 3.191′ N, 78° 52.431′ W. Marker is in Fayetteville, North Carolina, in Cumberland County. Marker is at the intersection of Cool Spring Street and Meeting
Lt Chas Cook Pic on Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 28, 2009
3. Lt Chas Cook Pic on Marker
[Caption reads] Lt. Charles B. Cook, FILI, wearing a plumed hat.
Street, on the right when traveling south on Cool Spring Street. Touch for map. Marker is about 50 feet south of Evans Metropolitan AME Zion Church. Marker is in this post office area: Fayetteville NC 28301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry Company (a few steps from this marker); Cross Creek Linear Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Flora Macdonald (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confederate War Memorial (about 500 feet away); Cross Creek Cemetery (about 500 feet away); Henry Evans (about 700 feet away); First Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Liberty Point Declaration of Independence (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fayetteville.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fayetteville Independent Light Infantry. (Submitted on May 24, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. FILI Museum Info. (Submitted on May 24, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Roy Raby's FSU Dissertation Abstract on FILI. (Submitted on May 24, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Edmund Jones Williams Collection at UNC. (Submitted on May 24, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Fraternal or Sororal OrganizationsGovernmentHeroesMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PlacesPatriots & PatriotismSettlements & SettlersWar, US Civil
 
Lt. Benjamin R. Huske Pic on Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 28, 2009
4. Lt. Benjamin R. Huske Pic on Marker
Isaac Hammond Grave Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., July 28, 2009
5. Isaac Hammond Grave Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 24, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,061 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 24, 2010, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.
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