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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Boulder City in Clark County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Hoover Dam and Lake Mead

 
 
Hoover Dam and Lake Mead Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 22, 2007
1. Hoover Dam and Lake Mead Marker
Inscription. Since 1935, Hoover Dam and Lake Mead have provided flood control, irrigation, drinking water, and power to communities in the desert. These resources have transformed the southwest into production farmland and thriving communities. The dam was originally built to protect farmland in southern California from flooding by the Colorado River. The Bureau of Reclamation planned the project and designed the dam. Engineering geologists played an important role by surveying the Colorado River for potential dam sites, conducting subsurface investigations, and mapping foundation conditions during construction.

Hoover Dam has long been recognized nationally and internationally as one of the world's greatest engineering and construction achievements. Built of 3.23 million cubic yards of concrete, the dam is 726 feet high, 660 feet thick at the base, and 1,244 feet long at the crest. It was the highest dam in the world from 1935 to 1967 and the largest hydroelectric plant in the world from 1936 to 1949. Lake Mead continues to be the largest man-made reservoir in North America. Built during the Great Depression, over 5,000 workers from virtually every state in the nation joined forces to complete Hoover Dam in less than 5 years. It was a symbol of national pride.

Water and power from Hoover Dam and Lake Mead have provided vital
Row of markers at Hoover Dam image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, June 7, 2010
2. Row of markers at Hoover Dam
Hoover Dam and Lake Mead Marker is second from left.
benefits to the southwest and the nation. Water from Lake Mead irrigates farmland in southern California and southwestern Arizona. Fruit and vegetables grown in this area are consumed across the country year round. Lake Mead supplies municipal water to Las Vegas, Phoenix, and 33 communities in the Los Angeles area. Hoover Dam generates 4 billion kilowatt hours of electricity a year, enough for 1.3 million people. This power is renewable and does not produce air pollution or toxic water. Income from the sale of electricity pays all to operating costs of the dam.

Lake Mead was established as the country's first national recreation area in 1964. It is the fifth most visited park in the National Park system. Nine million people a year come to Lake Mead for boating, fishing, swimming, camping, hiking, and picnicking. The lake covers 247 square mile and has 700 miles of shoreline. The recreation area covers 1.5 million acres and serves as a protected home for desert wildlife such as bighorn sheep, coyotes, jack rabbits, and desert tortoises.

Environmental impacts from construction of Hoover Dam have become apparent over the years. The Federal government and states of Nevada, Arizona, and California have initiated an innovative, 50-year program to protect fish and wildlife and restore habitats along the river from Lake Mead to the U.S.-Mexico border. Two species
Hoover Dam Markers image. Click for full size.
By Sandie Kirchner
3. Hoover Dam Markers
of native fish now endangered in the Lower Colorado River Basin are being grown for release into Lake Mead and other lower Colorado River areas. Four national wildlife refuges and one national wildlife area provide habitat for fish and waterfowl on the lower Colorado River.

For 70 years, Hoover Dam and Lake Mead have provided the benefits needed to make the desert southwest productive and livable. Without Hoover Dam and Lake Mead, major cities in Nevada, Arizona, and southern California could not exist as we know then today. This legendary project will continue to provide benefits will into the future as the southwest grows and prospers.
 
Erected 2005 by Association of Engineering Geologists.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the National Historic Landmarks marker series.
 
Location. 36° 0.998′ N, 114° 44.343′ W. Marker is near Boulder City, Nevada, in Clark County. Marker is on U.S. 93, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Boulder City NV 89005, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Civil Engineering Monument of the Millennium (here, next to this marker); They Died to Make the Desert Bloom (here, next to this
Hoover Dam image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 22, 2007
4. Hoover Dam
marker); They Laboured that Millions might see a Brighter Day (here, next to this marker); Dr. Elwood Mead (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Dr. Elwood Mead (here, next to this marker); Hoover Dam (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); High Scaler (about 700 feet away); Anson Smith (approx. mile away in Arizona). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Boulder City.
 
Regarding Hoover Dam and Lake Mead. The dam was started in 1931 and used enough concrete to build a road from New York to San Francisco. The stretch of water it created, Lake Mead, is 110 miles long and took six years to fill. The original road was opened at the same time as the famous dam in 1936.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesNatural Resources
 
Hoover Dam, Bureau of Reclamation Logo image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 22, 2007
5. Hoover Dam, Bureau of Reclamation Logo
Hoover Dam and Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner
6. Hoover Dam and Visitor Center
Markers are on the left side of roadway by the flag pole.
National Historic Landmark Designation Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Sandie Kirchner
7. National Historic Landmark Designation Plaque
40th Anniversary Hydroelectric Power Generation Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Sandie Kirchner
8. 40th Anniversary Hydroelectric Power Generation Plaque
Hoover Dam in the Afternoon Sunlight image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, 1983
9. Hoover Dam in the Afternoon Sunlight
National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Bowen, June 22, 2007
10. National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark
Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and the Hoover Dam Bypass image. Click for full size.
11. Hoover Dam, Lake Mead, and the Hoover Dam Bypass
A new bridge, spanning more than 1,000 feet across and 900 feet above the mighty Colorado River, is slowly taking shape below Hoover Dam here. It will carry a new section of US Route 93 past the bottleneck of the old road, which can be seen twisting and winding around and across the dam itself. Work on the bridge started in 2005 and should finish in 2010, at a cost of 160 million dollars. When complete, the Hoover Dam Bypass will provide a new link between the states of Nevada and Arizona. An estimated 17,000 cars and trucks will cross it every day.
Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, November 26, 2010
12. Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge
A view from the visitor center patio area.
Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, November 26, 2010
13. Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge
Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, November 26, 2010
14. Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge
The pedestrian walkway.
Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge Marker image. Click for full size.
By Denise Boose, November 26, 2010
15. Mike O'Callaghan - Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge Marker
Bridging Greatness In Memory of Sherman Jones, who lost his life during construcion. Dedicated by Iron Workers Local 416
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on June 25, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 5,577 times since then and 155 times this year. Last updated on June 14, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page was the Marker of the Week October 9, 2011. Photos:   1. submitted on June 25, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on June 14, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   3. submitted on June 15, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   4, 5. submitted on June 25, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   6, 7, 8. submitted on June 15, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.   9. submitted on November 4, 2011, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.   10. submitted on June 25, 2007, by Dawn Bowen of Fredericksburg, Virginia.   11. submitted on November 16, 2009, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.   12, 13, 14, 15. submitted on December 25, 2014, by Denise Boose of Tehachapi, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page.
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