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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Federals Take a Stand

 
 
Federals Take a Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
1. Federals Take a Stand Marker
Inscription. 7:00 a.m., July 9, 1864

After skirmishing on July 8 with Confederates west of Frederick, MD, Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace’s 5,800 Union troops—many of them “raw and untried”—took a stand at the Monocacy River. Wallace carefully chose this critical intersection of the river, road, and railroad to prevent Jubal A. Early’s 15,000 to 16,000 Confederates from attacking Washington.

Wallace positioned Brig. Gen. James B. Ricketts’ veteran troops on the river’s south bank. He sent 300 skirmishers to the north bank and a strong contingent to protect the road to Baltimore—his retreat route.

“All the gateways of the Shenandoah Valley—its roads, passes, gaps—were standing wide open, with Washington exposed, its very nakedness inviting attack. I lost no time also in picketing and placing strong guards over the bridges, especially the wooden one.” —Maj. Gen. Lew Wallace.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. This marker has been replaced by another marker nearby. 39° 22.248′ N, 77° 23.529′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Urbana Pike (State Highway 355), on the right
Federals Take a Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Federals Take a Stand Marker
The "Y" in the railroad tracks at Monocacy Junction can be seen here behind the marker. Ricketts' skirmishers fought to protect this juction during the early fighting on July 9, 1864.
when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop 2 of the Monocacy National Battlefield driving tour, near the 14th New Jersey Monument. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. Commemoration ( a few steps from this marker); 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment ( within shouting distance of this marker); Nick of Time ( about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Slave to Soldier ( about 400 feet away); Desperate Escape ( approx. ¼ mile away); Burning the Bridge ( approx. ¼ mile away); Burning of the Bridge (was approx. ¼ mile away but has been reported missing. ); L'Hermitage ( approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a map showing the Federal movements on the battlefield. Next to it is a photograph of “The Monocacy Junction station” which “was located between the tracks where the main line continued west toward Harpers Ferry and the spur turned north to Frederick, Maryland” and is known today as Frederick Junction. On the right is a portrait of Gen. Wallace with a background rendition of a train loaded with soldiers. “Wallace and some of his troops raced by train from
The Battle Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
3. The Battle Map
Baltimore to Monocacy Junction the night of July 4-5.”

This marker was replaced by a new one named Commemoration (see nearby markers).
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on October 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. General Lew Wallace. Gen. Wallace had a storied career. His Civil War service included a lack-luster performance on the first day of the Battle of Shiloh. But more important was his role as the “Savior of Washington” here at Monocacy. He served as the military judge for the trial of the Lincoln assassins and that of Henry Wirz, commandant of Andersonville Prison. Later he was appointed Governor of the Territory of New Mexico, helping to resolve the Lincoln County War. But he is most often recalled as the author of Ben-Hur. (Submitted on October 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. The 14th New Jersey Infantry Regiment. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
4. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional comments.
Marker and Pike Overpass image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
4. Marker and Pike Overpass

1. Federal Skirmish Line Detachments
The skirmishers sent forward were detachments from the 9th New York, 10th Vermont, 1st Maryland (Potomac Home Brigade), and 106th New York.
    — Submitted November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Federals Take a Stand Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
5. Federals Take a Stand Marker
Marker as seen from the 14th New Jersey Monument
Skirmish Line Fight image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
6. Skirmish Line Fight
Looking from the Best Farm at the location of the Federal skirmish line's battle positions. The Georgetown Pike (generally where the modern day Urbana Pike's guard rails are seen in the distance) intersected, and overpassed, the main line of the B&O Railroad (where the tree line running from the center to the right of the photo). The 14th New Jersey monument is just out of sight beyond the trees in the center. At the time of the battle, the tree line along the railroad didn't exist. A blockhouse fortification standing just to the northeast side of the wooden bridge for the Pike had a clear zone of fire across to the Best Farm. The blockhouse was later burned when the wooden bridge was set afire.
14th New Jersey Monument image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
7. 14th New Jersey Monument
Monocacy Junction image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
8. Monocacy Junction
Monocacy Junction image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
9. Monocacy Junction
The B&O Railroad Main Line image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
10. The B&O Railroad Main Line
Leading south towards Point of Rocks and eventually Harpers Ferry, the railroad here formed a defensible position for the Federals.
Site of Wooden Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
11. Site of Wooden Bridge
The Wooden Bridge stood close to where the modern truss bridge for the Urbana Pike stands today.
14th New Jersy Infantry Regiment Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, July 7, 2007
12. 14th New Jersy Infantry Regiment Monument
Standing nearby is this monument dedicated on July 9, 1907, costing some $4,000, to commemorate the service of the 14th New Jersey Infantry regiment at Monocacy. The regiment was one of those adding troops to the skirmish line that held here through most of the day.

The monument was re-dedicated on July 7, 2007, the day this photo was taken.
Inscription on the 14th New Jersey Monument image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
13. Inscription on the 14th New Jersey Monument
Erected by the State of
New Jersey to commemorate the
heroic services of the 14th Regiment
New Jersey Volunteer Infantry
1st Brigade, 3rd Division, 6th Corps
Army of the Potomac, at the
Battle of Monocacy, MD
July 9th 1864.
*********
The 14th Regiment New Jersey
Volunteers was organized on the
Monmouth Battle Ground and
mustered in to the United States
service near Freehold, New
Jersey, August 26th 1862 and was
mustered out June 18th 1865 near
Washington, D.C.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,536 times since then and 58 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 23, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on October 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   5. submitted on August 10, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   6. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   7, 8, 9. submitted on August 10, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   10. submitted on October 31, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   11. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   12, 13. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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