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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Thomas Farm

 
 
Thomas Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Thomas Farm Marker
Inscription. Col. C. Keefer Thomas, a businessman, should have stayed in Baltimore. He was so sure a war eventually would rage around that city that he moved his family to this 240-acre farm, called Araby. Soon troops were marching through or camping here in the fields where the Thomases raised corn, wheat, and other crops with slave labor. During the Battle of Monocacy, the family fled to the cellar as artillery shells and rifle shots tore up the house.

There was not a moment for four years when there were not from 4,000 to 14,000 soldiers camped on or near my farm. At the end of the war I had hardly a fence on my place, but I was glad to get a little of the quiet for which I had left the city.
C. Keefer Thomas

(Sidebar): A Meeting Place
In June 1863, a year before the battle, Union Maj. Gen. Winfield S. Hancock established his headquarters here at the Thomas farm for three days while his troops were heading north to Gettysburg.
In August 1864, a month after the battle, Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant met with Maj. Gen. Philip H. Sheridan and other military leaders at Araby to map plans for the Shenandoah Valley campaign.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. 39° 21.436′ 
Thomas Farm Tour Stop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
2. Thomas Farm Tour Stop
N, 77° 23.468′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker is on Baker Valley Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop four of the auto-tour of Monocacy Battlefield. This marker set is at the trail head for the Thomas Farm walking tour. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Thick of the Battle (here, next to this marker but has been reported missing); Federal Retreat (a few steps from this marker); Civilians Under Siege (within shouting distance of this marker); Final Attack (within shouting distance of this marker); Gordonís Decisive Attack (approx. ľ mile away but has been reported missing); Final Stand (approx. 0.3 miles away); Clustered Spires of Frederick (approx. half a mile away); History of the Monocacy River Valley (approx. half a mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The background image on the marker is a drawing of Araby. A small photograph in the upper center is a group portrait of three men, captioned, "On July 5, young Samuel S. Thomas [Center of photograph] and two friends were sitting on the Araby porch when U.S. soldiers forced them to join the 11th Maryland Regiment or face arrest. Fortunately a 'sympathetic
Thomas Farm Seen from Baker Valley Road image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
3. Thomas Farm Seen from Baker Valley Road
officer' let them go free after four days."
 
Also see . . .
1. Thomas Farm. More detailed information about the Thomas Farm, from the National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
View of Thomas Farm from eastern crest of Brooks Hill image. Click for full size.
August 23, 2008
4. View of Thomas Farm from eastern crest of Brooks Hill
Stone Culvert image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
5. Stone Culvert
Many trace remains of the old farm roads still exist on the Thomas Farm (and for that, all around the Monocacy Battlefield). This dry-laid stone culvert dates to the 19th century and carries a farm lane along the banks of the Monocacy River.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,926 times since then and 50 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on November 3, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on September 1, 2008.   5. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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