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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Worthington House

 
 
Worthington House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Worthington House Marker
Inscription. Fields of wheat and corn surrounded the hilltop farmhouse of John T. Worthington. Few trees obstructed his views of the meandering Monocacy River and Thomas farm to the east. In the two years since buying the 300-acre farm, Worthington had seen Federals and Confederates come and go, but this time both sides were amassing troops. While the family took refuge in the cellar, he had slaves take his horses to Sugarloaf Mountain. At one point, as he greeted Confederate Maj. Gen. John C. Breckinridge in the yard, a Union minie ball knocked the cane out of Worthington's hand.

(sidebar): Eyewitness
Glenn H. Worthington, as a boy of 6, watched the battle by peeking between the boards covering the cellar windows. In his 70s, after he had become a Frederick County judge, he wrote Fighting for Time, the only book-length account of the Battle of Monocacy for 130 years. This illustration of the house comes from that book.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. 39° 21.693′ N, 77° 24.127′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Baker Valley Road, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Located
Worthington House and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Worthington House and Marker
The Worthington House can be seen here behind the marker.
at stop three of the auto-tour of Monocacy Battlefield. This marker set is at the trail head for the Worthington Farm walking tour. To reach the stop, from Baker Valley Road, turn northwest onto the park service road (running parallel to Interstate 270, from which there is no direct access). Follow the service road to the parking lot near the Worthington House. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. McCausland’s Attack (a few steps from this marker); Worthington-McKinney Ford (a few steps from this marker); Through a Child's Eyes (within shouting distance of this marker); Ambush (within shouting distance of this marker); Gordon’s Decisive Attack (was approx. 0.6 miles away but has been reported missing. ); L'Hermitage (approx. 0.6 miles away); Caught in the Crossfire (approx. 0.7 miles away); Thick of the Battle (was approx. 0.7 miles away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The background image on the marker is a drawing of Worthington House taken from the book Fighting for Time. In the sidebar is a portrait of Glenn H. Worthington.
 
Also see . . .
Worthington Farm Tour Stop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
3. Worthington Farm Tour Stop

1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site for Worthington House. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Worthington House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 25, 2009
4. Worthington House Marker
Worthington House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, May 26, 2007
5. Worthington House
The house was built in 1851, and then purchased by John T. Worthington at the start of the Civil War. Glenn Worthington watched the battle through cracks in the boarded up basement windows.
West Side of Worthington House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
6. West Side of Worthington House
Confederate artillery deployed across the hilltop around the house during the battle. At the time, the position offered a commanding view of the surrounding fields. Today, however, tree lines around the modern I-270 limits observations.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,823 times since then and 73 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 23, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   4. submitted on August 9, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   5, 6. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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