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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Worthington-McKinney Ford

 
 
Worthington-McKinney Ford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 9, 2007
1. Worthington-McKinney Ford Marker
Inscription. 11:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m. July 9, 1864

Confederate troops succeeded in finding their way across the Monocacy River at the foot of this hill. Brig. Gen. John McCausland's 350 cavalrymen came up over the hill and assembled on the front yard of the Worthington farm. Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon's 3,000 infantrymen crossed about three hours later, swung south of the house, and proceeded over Brooks Hill to your left. The next goal of the Confederates: to maneuver around the Federals' left line on the neighboring Thomas farm.
 
Erected by Monocacy National Battlefield
National Parks Service.
 
Location. 39° 21.702′ N, 77° 24.131′ W. Marker is near Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Baker Valley Road when traveling south. Touch for map. Located at stop three of the auto-tour of Monocacy Battlefield. This marker set is at the trail head for the Worthington Farm walking tour. To reach the stop, from Baker Valley Road, turn northwest onto the park service road (running parallel to Interstate 270, from which there is no direct access). Follow the service road to the parking lot near the Worthington House. Marker is in this post office area: Frederick MD 21704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other
Worthington-McKinney Ford Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Worthington-McKinney Ford Marker
This marker is at stop 3 of the Monocacy Battlefield driving tour, near the Worthington House. The trail to the ford site can be seen on the right.
markers are within walking distance of this marker. Worthington House (a few steps from this marker); McCausland’s Attack (a few steps from this marker); Through a Child's Eyes (within shouting distance of this marker); Ambush (within shouting distance of this marker); Gordon’s Decisive Attack (was approx. 0.6 miles away but has been reported missing. ); L'Hermitage (approx. 0.6 miles away); Caught in the Crossfire (approx. 0.6 miles away); Thick of the Battle (was approx. 0.7 miles away but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
More about this marker. The background image on the marker shows Confederate cavalry crossing at the ford.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Monocacy. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Monocacy Battlefield Markers. This marker is among several describing the battle of Monocacy, to "tour" the battlefield see the related markers. (Submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Worthington Farm Tour Stop image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
3. Worthington Farm Tour Stop
The Worthington-McKinney Ford marker is on the right side of the trail.
Worthington-McKinney Ford image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
4. Worthington-McKinney Ford
The exact location of the ford cannot be plotted accurately as the river course has changed somewhat since the battle. Primary sources locate it near the mouth of Ballenger Creek, which has been diverted somewhat due to development on the west bank.

While the Monocacy is not a terribly deep course, nor very wide, from a military perspective just simply being able to cross a river is not enough. Military units require ground to stage prior to crossing, a wide enough trace to afford multi-file or two way traffic, and finally ground to reassemble the unit on the far side. Additionally, the crossing point should have some nearby terrain feature, such as a ridge or hill, to place artillery in order to suppress the enemy resistance to the crossing. Lastly, if possible, the crossing site should allow some degree of concealment from the enemy, lest the unit be attacked in mid-crossing. The commander's reports of the Monocacy Battle underscores these requirements as leaders struggled to locate proper military fords to bring their units into action.
Confederate Staging Area image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 3, 2007
5. Confederate Staging Area
Around this field, and several others on the banks of the Monocacy to the southwest of Worthington House, Confederates under Gen. John B. Gordon re-assembled after crossing the ford. In the background looms Brooks Hill, which concealed them from Federal artillery and observers.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,566 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   2. submitted on April 23, 2011, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on November 4, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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