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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Blairsville in Union County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Track Rock Gap

 
 
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 3, 2010
1. Track Rock Gap Marker
Inscription. One of the best-known of the petroglyph, or marked stone, sites in Georgia. The six table-sized soapstone boulders contain hundreds of symbols carved or pecked into their surface. Archaeologists have speculated dates for the figures from the Archaic Period (8,000 to 1,000 B.C.) to the Cherokee Indians who lived here until the 19th Century. No one knows the exact meaning of the symbols or glyphs which represent animals, birds, tracks and geometric figures. The earliest written account (1834) was by Dr. Matthew Stephenson, who was director of the U.S. Branch Mint in Dahlonega. One of the favorite stories about Track Rock Gap was recorded by ethnographer James Mooney who gathered Cherokee stories. The Cherokee called this site Datsu’nalasgun’ylu (where there are tracks) and Degayelun’ha (the printed or branded place). Cherokee stories include an explanation that hunters paused in the gap and amused themselves by carving the glyphs; the marks were made in a great hunt when the animals were driven through the gap, and that the tracks were made when the animals were leaving the great canoe after a flood almost destroyed the world and while the earth and rocks were soft.
 
Erected 1998 by Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 144-1.)
 
Marker series.
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Myers III, July 30, 2012
2. Track Rock Gap Marker
Appears to be original marker. Now on display at Trackrock Camp ground store.
This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 34° 52.978′ N, 83° 52.638′ W. Marker is in Blairsville, Georgia, in Union County. Marker is on Track Rock Gap Road 2.2 miles south of Young Harris Highway (U.S. 76), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. The marker is difficult to see from the roadway. There is a parking area about .05 south of the marker, with a trail leading to the marker and the soapstone boulders. Marker is in this post office area: Blairsville GA 30512, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trackrock Gap (was approx. 2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); Brasstown Bald (was approx. 2 miles away but has been reported missing. ); a different marker also named Brasstown Bald (approx. 3.8 miles away); Union County (approx. 4.6 miles away); Byron Herbert Reece (approx. 7.3 miles away); Towns County (approx. 8.1 miles away); a different marker also named Brasstown Bald (approx. 9.1 miles away); Blood Mountain (approx. 10.5 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Blairsville.
 
More about this marker. This marker replaced a missing earlier marker of the same title and similar text, erected by the Georgia Historical Commission.
 
Regarding Track Rock Gap.
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Myers III, July 30, 2012
3. Track Rock Gap Marker
Close up of the marker. Some of it is difficult to read. Track Rock Gap The micaceous soapstone rocks bear ancient Indian petroglyphs from which the Gap gets its name. The Cherokees called this place Datsu Nalȃŝ gun yi, (where there are tracks), or Degayeiũnhȃ, (Printed Place). Of the many theories of the origin of the tracks held by the Cherokees, probably the most sensible is that they were made by Indians for their own amusement. Another tradition is that they were made by a great army of birds and animals while the newly created earth’s surface was still soft, to escape pursuing danger from the west – some say a great ‘drive hunt’ of the Indians.
Track Rock Gap is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
 
Additional keywords. Petroglyphs
 
Categories. Man-Made FeaturesNative AmericansNotable Places
 
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Myers III, July 30, 2012
4. Track Rock Gap Marker
Apparently the markers have changed since the original photos were take. Mine are from 2012 and the markers are different and the trackrocks are not covered.
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Myers III, July 30, 2012
5. Track Rock Gap Marker
One of the new signs
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Myers III, July 30, 2012
6. Track Rock Gap Marker
Another new sign.
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 3, 2010
7. Track Rock Gap Marker
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 3, 2010
8. Track Rock Gap Marker
Track Rock Gap Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 3, 2010
9. Track Rock Gap Marker
Track Rock Gap Road can be seen in the background.
The Petroglyphs at Track Rock Gap image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 3, 2010
10. The Petroglyphs at Track Rock Gap
The Petroglyphs at Track Rock Gap image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, July 3, 2010
11. The Petroglyphs at Track Rock Gap
Track Rock image. Click for full size.
By William Henry Myers III, July 30, 2012
12. Track Rock
The biggest track rock
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 23, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,550 times since then and 51 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on July 23, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 1, 2014, by William Henry Myers III of Seneca, South Carolina.   7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on July 23, 2010, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   12. submitted on September 1, 2014, by William Henry Myers III of Seneca, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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