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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Panther Mound

 
 
Panther Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Toman, July 24, 2010
1. Panther Mound Marker
Inscription. To the native peoples who lived here, this water spirit represented the god of the underworld and has both spiritual and environmental significance.
 
Erected by Edgewood College.
 
Location. 43° 3.54′ N, 89° 25.128′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is on Edgewood Drive 0.1 miles west of Edgewood Avenue, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Madison WI 53711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Edgewood (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Welcome to the Edgewood Park and Pleasure Drive (approx. 0.2 miles away); Vilas (approx. mile away); Larson House (approx. 0.4 miles away); John M. Olin (approx. half a mile away); Bear (approx. half a mile away); Indian Mounds (approx. half a mile away); In Memory of Our Beloved Sons (approx. 0.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding Panther Mound. According to a 1996 survey by Robert A. Birmingham and Katherine H. Rankin entitled Native American Mounds in Madison and Dane County, "On the grounds of Edgewood College are thirteen mounds overlooking Lake Wingra. One early
Panther Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Toman, July 24, 2010
2. Panther Mound Marker
The mound is behind the marker, but it is difficult to discern in the dense underbrush. Moreover, there is a drainage swale passing over the mound that brings debris from the Edgewood College campus.
historical account described Lake Wingra in the summer as a sea of reeds and wild rice. The Winnebago used Lake Wingra as an abundant food source well after Euro-Americans began settling in the area. Along Edgewood Drive, which runs along the lakeshore, are seven conical mounds and the tip of a linear mound along the edge of a drainage swale. Between Edgewood Drive and the library are two remnants of a linear mound. On the other side of the library near Woodrow Street is a large bird effigy. Three conical mounds (of an original group of eight) remain along a path to the north of the Edgewood Campus Grade School playground. Finally, a low mound along the northeast wall of the student services building may be a remnant of one of two bear effigies that once existed on the grounds. Other large mound groups once existed in the Zoo and in the Wingra Park neighborhood to the west. Residential and park development have destroyed all traces."

According to the Madison Landmarks Commission, which designated the mound group, said to date from 700-1200 A.D., as a landmark (no. 104) in 1993, "Wisconsin has the highest concentration of effigy mounds in the United States and the Madison area has one of the highest concentration of effigy mounds remaining. Most mounds were lost to 19th century agricultural practices and city development. The mound builders were farmers who also engaged in
Map of Panther Mound Marker Area image. Click for full size.
By Native American Mounds in Madison and Dane County, July 24, 2010
3. Map of Panther Mound Marker Area
Black shading indicates existing mounds and grey shading indicates lost mounds.
hunting and gathering. They lived in small villages and migrated from one to another based on the seasonal availability of natural resources. The mounds often, but not always, have burials associated with them, but their exact purpose is not entirely understood. Mounds tend to have been built in places with beautiful views of the surrounding countryside. The mounds are considered sacred by modern Native Americans and should be treated with respect."
 
Also see . . .  Madison is an Indian mound capital. (related marker with links to other mound markers) (Submitted on July 24, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable Places
 
Indian Burial Mounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman
4. Indian Burial Mounds Marker
Two-tenths of a mile southwest of the Panther Mound marker is an earlier (1915) marker placed by the Wisconsin Archeological Society for the mound group.
Wide View of Indian Burial Mounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman
5. Wide View of Indian Burial Mounds Marker
The marker appears to be on top of one of the mounds.
Indian Burial Mounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman
6. Indian Burial Mounds Marker
View of nearby marker from Edgewood Drive.
Nearby Mound image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman
7. Nearby Mound
View of conical mound near Indian Burial Mounds marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 24, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 1,593 times since then and 49 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 24, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on July 28, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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