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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Amherstburg in Essex County, Ontario — Central Canada
 

The “Tecumseh Stone”

 
 
The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2010
1. The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker
A close up view of just the English portion of the text on the historical marker.
Inscription. Tradition has it that the Indian leader Tecumseh stood upon this stone to deliver a final address to the British at Amherstburg after the Battle of Lake Erie. Donated in 1939, it originally stood near the corner of Dalhousie and Gore Streets. In his speech Tecumseh asserted, in part:

Father, listen...You always told us to remain here and take care of our lands. It made our hearts glad to hear that was your wish; our great father the king is the head, you represent him. You always told us you would never draw your foot off the British ground; but now, father, we see you drawing back, and we are sorry to see our father doing so without seeing the enemy. We must compare our father's conduct to a fat animal, that carries its tail upon its back; but when affrighted, it drops it between its legs and runs off.

Father. You have got the arms and ammunition which our great father sent for his red children. If you have any idea of going away, give them to us and you may go and welcome. For us, our lives are in the hands of the Great Spirit; we are determined to defend our lands; and if it is his will we wish to leave our bones upon them


Nonetheless, when the British under Major-General Henry Procter abandoned Fort Malden in late September of 1813. Tecumseh and his followers reluctantly accompanied them. Overtaken
The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2010
2. The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker
A close up view of just the French portion of the text on the historical marker.
by the Americans, the British and Indians from Malden were defeated in the Battle of the Thames on October 5, 1813. Tecumseh was killed in the engagement.
 
Location. 42° 6.477′ N, 83° 6.781′ W. Marker is in Amherstburg, Ontario, in Essex County. Marker is on Laird Avenue South south of Elm Avenue, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. This historical marker is located at the Fort Malden National Historic Site, in front of the National Historic Site's visitor center, and behind the famous "Tecumseh Stone.". Marker is in this post office area: Amherstburg, Ontario N9V 1X5, Canada.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Malden Points of Interest (a few steps from this marker); Major John Richardson (a few steps from this marker); Pensioner's Cottage (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Amherstburg (Fort Malden) (within shouting distance of this marker); Shoreline Breakwall (within shouting distance of this marker); Detroit River Heritage (within shouting distance of this marker); Indian Council House (within shouting distance of this marker); Privy (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Amherstburg.
 
Regarding The "Tecumseh Stone". During a recent visit to Fort Malden I discovered
The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2010
3. The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker
View of both the English and the French portions of this historical marker.
that both the "Tecumseh Stone" and the historical marker that went with it were no longer situated in front of the park's visitor center. Upon inquiring with the park's staff I was told that the Tecumseh Stone had been moved and is currently on display inside of the Fort Malden Museum (which is located on the grounds of the this military park).

Unfortunately for me, the museum was closed for renovations, probably for the impending bicentennial celebration for the role the War of 1812 role that Fort Malden played when General Harrison invade Upper Canada. So I was unable to see the "Tecumseh Stone" at its "new" location.

From talking with the park's seasonal staff, it would seem that the "Tecumseh Stone" was relocated shortly after the conclusion of the 2010 tourist season and prior to the 2011 tourist season.

So this historical marker is no longer located outdoors, and is no longer available to be seen whether or not you pay a park admission fee, rather, it has been relocated to the park's museum and is currently part of an indoor display. However, the "Tecumseh Stone" is still on the grounds of Fort Malden and a short distance away from its previous location.
 
Also see . . .  Speech to Major General Henry Procter at Fort Malden (1813)
The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2010
4. The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker
View of both the historical marker and the "Tecumseh Stone."
. This is a link to information provided by Milestone Documents. (Submitted on August 14, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansWar of 1812
 
The "Tecumseh Stone" image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, August 9, 2010
5. The "Tecumseh Stone"
View of the "Tecumseh Stone" situated in front of the Fort Malden Historical Site, Visitor Center.
The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 15, 2013
6. The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker
A more recent view of the site where the "Tecumseh Stone" use to be located, showing that the historical marker has been removed from this location.
The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 15, 2013
7. The "Tecumseh Stone" Marker
View of the building on the grounds of Fort Malden, that houses the park's museum, and is the location where the "Tecumseh Stone" is now being displayed, indoors.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on August 14, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 2,776 times since then and 175 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 14, 2010, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.   6, 7. submitted on June 17, 2013, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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