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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Bethesda in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Sumner

 
 
Fort Sumner Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, November 5, 2007
1. Fort Sumner Marker
Inscription. Forts Alexander, Ripley and Franklin, built to protect the Washington water system in 1861, were connected by earthworks in 1863 and renamed Ft. Sumner to honor Maj. Gen. Edwin V. Sumner, A hero of Antietam. The fortís 28 cannon providea a formidable bulwark against raiding Confederates. Nothing remains of the fort but an outline of it appears on the reverse.
 
Erected 1963 by the Montgomery County Historical Society and Maryland Civil War Centennial Commission.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 57.379′ N, 77° 7.32′ W. Marker is in Bethesda, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of Sangamore Road and Westpath Way, on the left when traveling north on Sangamore Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Bethesda MD 20816, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Col. Guilford Dudley Bailey (approx. 0.7 miles away); Battery Bailey (approx. ĺ mile away); A Canal Home (approx. 0.8 miles away); Glen Echoís Art Deco Arcade (approx. 1.1 miles away);
Map on Back of Fort Sumner Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, November 5, 2007
2. Map on Back of Fort Sumner Marker
The white paint has worn off, making it hard to see.
c. 1926 (approx. 1.1 miles away); Trolley Parks In America (approx. 1.1 miles away); A Trolley Returns to Glen Echo (approx. 1.1 miles away but has been reported missing); Glen Echo Civil Rights Protest (approx. 1.1 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Bethesda.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia entry for Edwin Vose Sumner, U.S. Army. (Submitted on March 27, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. "The Fort"
When I was a boy my friends and I played on the vine-covered sides and gun emplacements of Ft. Sumner. It was known to all as, simply, "The Fort". I lived barely 100 yards from it on Wehawken Road. Sangamore Road was then a country lane and Westpath Way didn't exist. My sister, who now lives in Montgomery Hills, found a cannonbal on "The Fort". It was hollow and had holes opposite each other so my father put a rope through it, used it for an anchor, and lost it in the Potomac. I have four foot section of roughsawn floor joist from one of the barracks in my garage here in Oregon. Yes, I graduated from "BCC High School" in
Fort Sumner Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, November 5, 2007
3. Fort Sumner Marker
1955 and turned 72 last December. There was a little "island of diversity" hard upon the sides of that fort in the '40s and '50s. Descendants of freed slaves who had moved into the fort after the Civil War still lived there, across the street from wartime government workers from all over the US. It was a colorful, wonderful, time to grow up.
    — Submitted May 14, 2010, by Joseph F. Ward of Shady Cove, Oregon.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNotable PersonsWar, US Civil
 
Fort Sumner Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, November 5, 2007
4. Fort Sumner Marker
MGen Edwin Vose Sumner image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia, circa 1862
5. MGen Edwin Vose Sumner
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 11, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,357 times since then and 158 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 11, 2007, by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5. submitted on December 22, 2012, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.
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