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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Winchester in Frederick County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Northern Victory, Southern Defeat

 
 
Northern Victory, Southern Defeat Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
1. Northern Victory, Southern Defeat Marker
Inscription. As Southern units retreated and resistance fell apart, Northern victory was assured.

Jackson found himself surrounded by a disorderly retreat of his soldiers. In the growing dark, a few fresh Southern units made gallant attempts to cover the Southern retreat from Northern pursuit. One group formed a defensive square until they were completely surrounded and had to surrender. In the fields where you now stand, Northern horsemen gathered up approximately 250 wounded and retreating Southern troops, among them Jackson's brother-in-law and Sgt. Major Randolph Barton of the 33rd Virginia.

That night Jackson camped the disorganized remnants of his army just south of Newtown (now Stephens City) along the Valley turnpike. His men had, within two days, marched forty miles and fought a battle against superior numbers. Jackson's own performance had been less than exemplary. He had risked his army by pitching it headlong into a larger Northern force without an adequate picture of enemy strength. He failed to rely on his subordinates and communicate his battle plan to them. Finally, Jackson chose to fight this battle from the rear, feeding his units into the fight rather than being at the front and controlling the action. He would not make the same mistake again.

Kate Sperry, a young woman from Winchester, visited several days
Forces Engaged and Casualty Figures image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
2. Forces Engaged and Casualty Figures
after the battle. In her diary she described what she saw.

"...we walked over a portion of it - where the fight was the thickest... the trees were scarred all over and branches shot off by the balls - the ground discolored by the blood of our men and Yanks also. I got a bullet that one of the Yanks fired at our men when our men were behind the stone wall - or fence rather ... Mr. M. assisted to bury our men - 79 in a tiny trench - side by side and a rail fence around them ... it was truly sad to see them - a haversack belonging to some of our men was lying on the ground by the fence, a piece of grey blanket and an old coat, part of a red flannel shirt ... . I brought away a piece of that stone fence - am going to preserve it."
-Kate Sperry diary excerpt
 
Location. 39° 9.146′ N, 78° 12.999′ W. Marker is near Winchester, Virginia, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from Jones Road (County Route 621), on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Located at stop seven of the walking tour of Rose Hill. See the link to the Museum of the Shenandoah for details about visiting Rose Hill. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1985 Jones Road, Winchester VA 22602, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fight for the High Ground
Walking Tour Stop Seven for Rose Hill image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
3. Walking Tour Stop Seven for Rose Hill
(about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Defense of the Stone Wall (about 500 feet away); The Order for Retreat (about 600 feet away); How To See the Battlefield (approx. 0.2 miles away); War in the Backyard (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Advance of Tylerís Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away); Rose Hill (approx. ľ mile away); The First Battle of Kernstown (approx. 1.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Winchester.
 
More about this marker. On the upper left of the marker is a portrait of "Sergeant Major Randolph Barton of the 33rd Virginia Infantry," who "was one of more than 250 Southern soldiers captured as a result of the 1st Battle of Kernstown. He, like many of Jackson's men, was originally from the area." In the side bar quote to the right is a portrait of Kate Sperry. A breakdown of the numbers of men engaged and casualties for both sides is displayed in the lower center of the marker.
 
Regarding Northern Victory, Southern Defeat. This is one of seven battlefield
Confederate Retreat image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
4. Confederate Retreat
Looking back to the north along the trail. Confederates fell back through here in disarray in the closing stages of the battle (toward the camera).
interpretive markers at Rose Hill. See the related markers section below for a listing of the walking tour, or the Kernstown Battles Virtual Tour by Markers in the links section for a driving tour.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kernstown Battles Virtual Tour by Markers. This marker is related to several markers in the area detailing the actions of two separate battles occurring around Kernstown during the Civil War. The sites include walking trails at the Pritchard-Grim Farm and Rose Hill. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Rose Hill - Museum of the Shenandoah. The walking tour of Rose Hill is open for self-guided tours on the third Saturday of each month April through October from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Battle of First Kernstown Summary. The action around Rose Hill is discussed in phase three of this National Parks Service battle summary. (Submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Federal Pursuit image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, October 20, 2007
5. Federal Pursuit
In this draw the Federal cavalry and infantry pressed the Confederates, capturing several including many of the wounded. The grain silo was built well after the war, but serves as a good place-mark to aid orientation around the battlefield site today. Note the marker standing nearby.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,331 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on November 12, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.
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