Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Alexandria in Calhoun County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Lincoyer

and The Battle of Tallasehatchee

 
 
Lincoyer Marker Side A image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, October 2, 2010
1. Lincoyer Marker Side A
Inscription.
At this site, on Nov. 3, 1813, after the Battle of Tallasehatchee, known then as Talluschatches, during the Creek Indian War, Gen. Andrew Jackson found a dead Creek Indian woman embracing her living infant son. Gen. Jackson, upon hearing that the other Creek Indian women were planning to kill the infant, as was their custom when all relations were dead, became himself the protector and guardian of the child.

Because of his compassion, Gen. Jackson took the infant to Fort Struther, in present day Ohatchee, where he nursed him back to health. Gen. Jackson then took the baby to his family home, the Hermitage, in Nashville, Tenn., where he and his wife Rachel named the child Lincoyer and adopted, raised, loved and educated him as their son.

Lincoyer fell ill and died of Tuberculosis at home with his family, when he was 16 years old. The General and his wife mourned the loss of their son for the rest of their lives.

Dedicated August 2000

(Back):
This memorial marks the site where Lincoyer was found and saved by Gen. Andrew Jackson after the Battle of Talluschatches, during the Creek Indian War.

Through the special efforts of and by Commissioner Eli Henderson and the Calhoun County Commission, to preserve, save and commemorate
Lincoyer Marker Side B image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, October 2, 2010
2. Lincoyer Marker Side B
the History of Calhoun County, this monument was erected.

Calhoun County Commission

James Eli Henderson - Chairman
James A. “Pappy” Dunn
Robert W. Downing
Randy Wood
Lea Fite

 
Erected 2000 by Calhoun County Commission.
 
Location. 33° 47.007′ N, 85° 55.576′ W. Marker is near Alexandria, Alabama, in Calhoun County. Marker is on McCullars Lane west of County Road 73, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. McCullars Lane located about 1.5 miles east of U.S. Highway 431. Marker is in this post office area: Alexandria AL 36250, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Tallasahatchie Battle Field (here, next to this marker); Crook Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away); Tallasseehatchee (approx. 2.2 miles away); Major John Pelham (approx. 4.5 miles away); The Birthplace of the “Gallant Pelham” (approx. 4.6 miles away); Janney Furnace (approx. 5.5 miles away); Fort Strother (approx. 7.9 miles away); Battle of “Ten Islands” (approx. 7.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Alexandria.
 
Categories. Native AmericansNotable PersonsWars, US Indian
 
Lincoyer Marker and The Battle of Tallasehatchee Memorial Site image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, October 2, 2010
3. Lincoyer Marker and The Battle of Tallasehatchee Memorial Site
Adoption of Lincoyer image. Click for full size.
Tennessee State Library and Archives
4. Adoption of Lincoyer
Junction of McCullars Lane and County Road 73 image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, October 2, 2010
5. Junction of McCullars Lane and County Road 73
Image of Lincoyer image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, October 2, 2010
6. Image of Lincoyer
Fus-hatchee Miko of the Kasihta image. Click for full size.
By John Trumbull, July 1790
7. Fus-hatchee Miko of the Kasihta
Unfortunately the engraving on the marker does not appear to be Lincoyer (who died at 16) but is similar to this sketch of Tuskatche Mico, or, The Birdtail King of the Cusitah Creeks, taken from John Trumbull's, "Autobiography, Reminiscences and Letters of John Trumbull, from 1756 to 1841."
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 22, 2017. This page originally submitted on October 4, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,672 times since then and 110 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 4, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   4. submitted on May 15, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.   5, 6. submitted on October 4, 2010, by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   7. submitted on May 15, 2015, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement