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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Portsmouth, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Emanuel A.M.E. Church

 
 
Emanuel AME Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Thomson, October 11, 2010
1. Emanuel AME Church Marker
Inscription. Emanuel A.M.E. Church is rooted in the African Methodist Society that was formed soon after the founding in 1772 of the Methodist Society in Portsmouth. The African Society met independently until Nat Turner's insurrection in 1831, worshiped with white Methodists for three years, then met under white supervision until 1864. The members occupied a Methodist church on Glasgow Street until the building burned in 1856. Slaves and free blacks provided most of the funds and labor to construct the North Street Methodist Church in 1857. In 1871, the congregation adopted the name Emanuel ("God with us") and become part of the African Methodist Episcopal movement.
 
Erected 1999 by Commonwealth of Virginia. (Marker Number Q 8-t.)
 
Location. 36° 50.288′ N, 76° 18.322′ W. Marker is in Portsmouth, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of Green Street and North Street, on the right when traveling north on Green Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 637 North Street, Portsmouth VA 23704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ruth Brown (here, next to this marker); Matilda Sissieretta Joyner Jones (here, next to this marker); Lincolnsville
Emanuel A.M.E. Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 12, 2014
2. Emanuel A.M.E. Church Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); John Luke Porter (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Saint Paul's School (about 700 feet away); The Confederate Section (about 800 feet away); Collier's Raid (approx. 0.2 miles away); Watts House (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Portsmouth.
 
Regarding Emanuel A.M.E. Church. Said to be a stop in the Underground Railroad

Note the subtle difference in wording between the marker and the plaque on the building.
 
Also see . . .
1. Virginia African American Heritage Program. Virginia Foundation for the Humanities (Submitted on October 12, 2010, by James Thomson of Chesapeake, United States.) 

2. Nat Turner's Rebellion - MPT. (Submitted on October 18, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRAfrican AmericansChurches, Etc.Colonial Era

 
Emanuel AME Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By James Thomson, October 11, 2010
3. Emanuel AME Church Marker
Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church image. Click for full size.
By James Thomson, October 11, 2010
4. Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church
The congregation of Emanuel Church was formed out of the Methodist Society by Robert Williams, who erected a meeting house on South Street in 1772. Thus two societies were established. The black people called their society the African Methodist Society.
Until Nat Turner's insurrection in 1831, we occupied a building on Washington Street. It was then that we were forced to worship with the white Methodists until they built a new church in 1856. That building was destroyed by fire and the congregation, largely slaves and freed blacks, built this church building and dedicated it in November 1857.
In 1871, the then 99 year old congregation joined the African Methodist Episcopal Church and renamed itself Emanuel, meaning "God with us".
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 11, 2010, by James Thomson of Chesapeake, United States. This page has been viewed 1,130 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on October 11, 2010, by James Thomson of Chesapeake, United States.   2. submitted on February 14, 2014, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on October 11, 2010, by James Thomson of Chesapeake, United States.   4. submitted on October 12, 2010, by James Thomson of Chesapeake, United States. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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