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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Richmond, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Franklin Street Burying Grounds

 
 
Franklin Street Burying Grounds Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 6, 2010
1. Franklin Street Burying Grounds Marker
Inscription.
Reconsecration
of the
Franklin Street
Burying Grounds


The first Jewish
Cemetery in Virginia
Founded 1791

Commemorating
the 300th anniversary
of the first permanent
Jewish settlement
in the United States

This memorial erected by
Congregation Beth Ahabah
Richmond, Virginia

Unveiling April 24, 1955

Rededication services
under auspices
Richmond Tercentenary Committee
of the
Richmond Jewish Community Council

 
Erected 1955 by Congregation Beth Ahabah.
 
Location. 37° 31.931′ N, 77° 25.466′ W. Marker is in Richmond, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of East Franklin Street and North 21st Street, on the right when traveling east on East Franklin Street. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond VA 23223, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Early Quakers in Richmond (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Oldest House (about 500 feet away); Historic Shockoe Valley (about 500 feet away); Confederate General Hospital No. 12
Inscription on the arch reads "First Jewish Cemetery in Virginia 1791" image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, October 6, 2010
2. Inscription on the arch reads "First Jewish Cemetery in Virginia 1791"
(about 500 feet away); Francis Asbury (about 500 feet away); City of Richmond Bicentennial (about 500 feet away); To Honor (about 500 feet away); Richmond Hill (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond.
 
Regarding Franklin Street Burying Grounds. “…When this cemetery was deeded by Isaacs, Franklin Street was known as “Middle Street,” the city at that time being only three or four blocks wide. The rapid growth of the community led to the abandonment of the old cemetery about 1817, for the one located at the head of Fourth Street. When the use of the old cemetery was discontinued, several bodies were removed to the new. The stones remaining were laid flat and covered with earth. The ground formerly about four feet below the grade of the street was filled to its present level. Over thirty years a coal and wood dealer enjoyed squatter sovereignty on it, rent free. A bill-board stood in front of it, and carts, lumber and trash were stored therein. As early as 1856, members of the Congregation Beth Shalome called attention to its bad condition. Shortly before his death, in 1908, Captain E. J. Levy, secretary of the Cemetery Board, offered a motion providing for the reclaiming of the ground and its taking over by that body. The work was taken up shortly after his death. Numerous private subscriptions enabled the erection of a solid concrete wall, a substantial iron railing on top, and a seven foot iron fence on the street front. On September 21, 1909, Rabbi E. N. Calisch, in the presence of a reverent audience, performed the ceremony of reconsecration.” The History of the Jews of Richmond from 1769 to 1917, Chapter XLVII. Herbert T. Ezekiel & Gaston Lichtenstein, Copyrighted 1917.
 
Also see . . .  Congregation Beth Ahabah. (Submitted on October 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesSettlements & Settlers
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on October 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 857 times since then and 43 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 21, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.
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