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McKees Rocks in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

McKees Rocks Mound

 
 
McKees Rocks Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, March 13, 2011
1. McKees Rocks Mound Marker
Inscription. Largest Native American burial mound in Western Pennsylvania (16 feet high & 85 feet wide). It was hand-built by the Adena people between 200 BC and 100 AD and later used by the Hopewell people. Late 19th century excavations uncovered 33 skeletons and artifacts made of stone, copper, and shells.
 
Erected 2002 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 40° 28.38′ N, 80° 3.095′ W. Marker is in McKees Rocks, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Marker can be reached from Sproul Street 0.1 miles east of Shingiss Street. Touch for map. Located behind the Rangers Field ballpark at the end of Sproul Street. Marker is in this post office area: Mc Kees Rocks PA 15136, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. St. Mary's Ukrainian Orthodox Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); 1909 McKee's Rocks Strike (approx. half a mile away); The McKee Mansion (approx. half a mile away); Presston (approx. 0.9 miles away); Michael A. Musmanno (approx. 1.2 miles away); Corliss Street Tunnel (approx. 1.5 miles away); Davis Island Lock and Dam (approx. 1.6 miles away); Greenstone United Methodist Church (approx. 1.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in McKees Rocks.
 
Also see . . .
McKees Rocks Mound Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, March 13, 2011
2. McKees Rocks Mound Marker
 McKees Rocks Mound - Behind the Marker. ExplorePAhistory.com (Submitted on March 15, 2011, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. AnthropologyNative Americans
 
Vicinity of Pittsburgh: McKees Rocks and Ancient Mound image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
3. Vicinity of Pittsburgh: McKees Rocks and Ancient Mound
Credit: Historical Society of Western Pennsylvania
Initial excavation of McKees Rocks Mound image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, 1896
4. Initial excavation of McKees Rocks Mound
McKees Rocks Mound, the largest mound built in Pennsylvania by Native Americans, was located about four miles south of Pittsburgh, at the confluence of Chartiers Creek and the Ohio River. Before its excavation in 1896 by Frank M. Gerrodette of the Carnegie Museum, the mound was 85 feet in diameter and 16 feet high. Today only a remnant of the original mound survives. Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh.
McKees Rocks Mound before excavation image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, July 1896
5. McKees Rocks Mound before excavation
In 1896, Frank M. Gerrodette of the Carnegie Museum conducted the first excavation of the McKees Rocks Mound and discovered three construction layers, each of which contained human burials. The lower layers dated to the Early Woodland Adena culture, ca. 1200BC-500BC, and the upper layer to the Middle Woodland Hopewell culture, ca. 500BC-800AD. Today only a remnant of the original mound survives. Courtesy of Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on March 14, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,371 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on March 14, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   3, 4, 5. submitted on July 26, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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